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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This was a battle during the "Civil War" or "War for Southern Independence" as I prefer to call it. It occurred October 21, 1861 in the very northern part of Laurel County Kentucky. The Federal Troops had an encampment on the "Old Wilderness Road" to block entry of Confederate Troops to central Kentucky.
Wood Font Art History Metal

A batallion of about 600 Indiana Troops backed up by 1st Kentucky Cavalry (US) hurried to A steep hill called "Hoosier Knob" now and set up earthworks and Log fortifications. The Tennessee Confederate troops attempted to Attack up the steep hill but were repulsed due to Terrain and good fortifications.

It was about the same as the famous battle at Little Round Top but steeper. This hill is inaccessible on 2 sides due to a 20 ft cliff
Plant Green Natural landscape Terrestrial plant Wood


and the Federal Army had managed to drag 2 Cannon to the top of the hill using 100 men and mules.
Wheel Plant Automotive tire Tree Groundcover

The Federals lost 5 KIA and the Confederates lost 11 KIA. Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer decided to withdraw back to Cumberland gap but a large trench system was Dug the next day in case the Confederates decided to return. The trenches are still clearly visible.
Plant Tree Green Natural landscape Terrestrial plant


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A rock shelter on the way to the top.
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About 10 years after the battle the Confederate soldiers bodies were dug up ( from a mass grave) and moved to a Cemetary at Crab Orchard Ky about 25 miles away. There is a monument there and a ring of gravestones. I had photos of this but they were on Photobucket.
The next year, General Zollicoffer was killed at the Battle of Mill Springs as he tried to invade via Wayne county and Nancy Ky.
There is a Confederate cemetery and a monument at that location.
Plant Tree Headstone Trunk Artifact

By the way, there was almost another battle "Here" as BLM was reported to be bringing 2 bus loads of "Protesters" to this site to overturn this monument. The Sheriff passed the word and about 400 Armed county Residents took up positions to keep this from happening. The Busses turned around and went back to Lexington.
This could have gone "off the rails" real quick.
 

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War of Northern Aggression
 

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There’s a saying that goes something like “If we forget History we are bound to repeat it“. That was an interesting trip you took us on, JR. Jan’s grandfather, a northerner, was captured by the dirty rebels at Spotsylvania Court House, Virginia at the age of 14. He was a drummer boy. He was marched down to Andersonville Prison in Georgia. No busses or trains then. He was liberated after some time there and walked back to Marshall, Michigan as again there were no busses like the BLM had. Does the picture of JB at the cannon suggest she may have been a Southern Gun Moll? I am amazed by what those men on both sides did to move armament around without tanks, track vehicles, and machinery in the absence of highways and paved roads.
Do you think about how soft we’ve become as you pack the camper to go prairie dogging?
 

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FB been to Spotsylavania battle a few times as well as the Wilderness and quite a few other battlefields in that area . As well as growing up in Mechanicsville VA it was riddled with battlefields and small skirmish or raids. It's is amazing to see the earthworks that was dug close to 150 years+ ago.
Richmond burned itself instead of turning over to the Yankees . To this day they are finding old items where people threw their valuables down the old outhouses instead of turning them over . I know a few boys the dig them up when they think they have found one. I remember as a lad kicking up mini balls and finding different things in the back yard . I can only imagine. The High school I went to was named Lee Davis High School here recently they changed the name. JR thanks for educating me on this battlefield I have special place for this war in my heart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
One thing I did not mention is how remote this little spot is. You drive Waaay back down a one lane county road, then walk a path down a ridgeline and climb a big hill. It sits right on the Old Wilderness Road.
The Cannon present are Reproductions or some one would Steal them.
Coyote George and Lee Bullock have both been there I'm sure.
Very unlike the Virginia battlefields and I have been to a lot of them over the years.
@FBecigneul I remember a story of the author James Lee Burke of New Iberia, Louisiana. His G G Grandfather and GG uncle were captured, taken to prison in Canada. War ended, OK fellas, walk home and it took most of a year. I wound up with his GG Grandfather's Sword...long story there...and returned it to him at a VERY cheap price as I got it cheap at a flea market. He cried when he got it.
America has problems now that could have been avoided had things turned out differently. Jest sayin...
 

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A very interesting and informative read and l thank you.
Having read most, if not all, of James Burke's books plus one or two by his daughter Alafair, quite a bit closer to home, knowing you and Judy. I just looked her up and gathered some background info on the family as well as James hissef.
The returning of the sword is quite the couple JR. Care to flesh it out? Inquiring mind here.
PS - the desert recipes would be welcomed. :) :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Well, James Lee Burke wrote a book (based on Truth) about his ancestors during the War Between the States titled "White Doves at Morning"
He mentioned his ancestor Lt. Robert S Perry and I think the 8th Louisiana Infantry in the book. I was listening to this as an audiobook while on the mail route. About the 3rd time I heard the name, it kinda rang a bell...
When I got home, i Looked. And sure enough, that was the name on the Sword I had bought at a Flea Market in Tennessee. I had bought it from a "regular" an old lady that I had purchased from before, who came up with nice things sometimes. She Said she had bought 3 Items from a Damgrandkid who inherited it from a deceased collector in Virginia. There were also 2 SS Officer Daggers. I only managed to scratch together enough to buy the Sword. Dammit.
A few years later, James Lee Burke was doing a book event and I took the sword to let him LOOK at it. He was in Shock. I told him that if I ever decided to sell it, it would be to him.
Couple more years passed.
Now Tom mentioned Alafair his daughter. I have forgot the details but we communicated and she wanted to buy it for her father. I decided to Run the Item with a Full description on Ebay with a very extreme reserve that would not be reached. I would sell it to her at the Highest price reached.
I contacted her and she agreed to buy it so I shipped it to her I believe in Montana. (JLB has a home there also).
The Sword would NOW be worth several Thousand more Dollars than what I sold it for, but I felt JLB deserved it back.
True Story. Nobody could make THAT crazy story up.
Lt. Robert S Perry I think wound up a Captain and maybe higher before his capture I forget where. He later became a Representative or Senator or something. Book tells where he was burried in ? Parish cem in Louisiana.
 

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Dang, l knew not of "White Doves". I don't think it is in the library audio, bluetooth system. Need to look harder as I really enjoy his writing, even though it can get a bit "dark" at times. Those audio books can really make an afternoon fly by or reduce 6 hrs of windshield time to nuttin.
Heckuva coincidence w the sword, fer sher.
 

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Thanks for posting this, JR. It was a very interesting period of history. Back when I was a Boy Scout Scoutmaster I took the troop to both Shiloh and Vicksburg to hike the trails. If I remember correctly the hikes were about 14 miles.

Arkansas had several smaller less recognized battles in the State. Probably the most famous was the Battle of Pea Ridge. The battle of Brownsville took place near Lonoke. The fish farm that I did the electrical work for had several ponds on that battlefield. The guy that built most of the ponds had a nice collection of stuff that he found while doing the dozer work. The original Pine Bluff Court House was under attack and reportably had a cannon ball embed in a wall. A hunting buddy found a cannon ball in his back yard, way on the South end of town. Our private range near England, where I just moved from, was in an area known locally as Union Valley where there was a minor battle.

A good buddy attended a metal detecting class near Scott AR a few years ago and gave me a minni ball that he found. My FFL buddy has a large collection of bullets that he found near DeValls Bluff, located near the White River.

Like I said, a very interesting period of history.
 

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JR I really have to Thank You for such and interesting dissertation......
WELL DONE....
Hard to believe the state of mind it takes for brother to fight brother..... countrymen fighting countrymen.....
What a terrible piece of our history.
 

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This was a battle during the "Civil War" or "War for Southern Independence" as I prefer to call it. It occurred October 21, 1861 in the very northern part of Laurel County Kentucky. The Federal Troops had an encampment on the "Old Wilderness Road" to block entry of Confederate Troops to central Kentucky.
View attachment 30331
A batallion of about 600 Indiana Troops backed up by 1st Kentucky Cavalry (US) hurried to A steep hill called "Hoosier Knob" now and set up earthworks and Log fortifications. The Tennessee Confederate troops attempted to Attack up the steep hill but were repulsed due to Terrain and good fortifications.

It was about the same as the famous battle at Little Round Top but steeper. This hill is inaccessible on 2 sides due to a 20 ft cliff
View attachment 30329

and the Federal Army had managed to drag 2 Cannon to the top of the hill using 100 men and mules.
View attachment 30330
The Federals lost 5 KIA and the Confederates lost 11 KIA. Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer decided to withdraw back to Cumberland gap but a large trench system was Dug the next day in case the Confederates decided to return. The trenches are still clearly visible.
View attachment 30328

View attachment 30332
A rock shelter on the way to the top.
View attachment 30333
About 10 years after the battle the Confederate soldiers bodies were dug up ( from a mass grave) and moved to a Cemetary at Crab Orchard Ky about 25 miles away. There is a monument there and a ring of gravestones. I had photos of this but they were on Photobucket.
The next year, General Zollicoffer was killed at the Battle of Mill Springs as he tried to invade via Wayne county and Nancy Ky.
There is a Confederate cemetery and a monument at that location.
View attachment 30334
By the way, there was almost another battle "Here" as BLM was reported to be bringing 2 bus loads of "Protesters" to this site to overturn this monument. The Sheriff passed the word and about 400 Armed county Residents took up positions to keep this from happening. The Busses turned around and went back to Lexington.
This could have gone "off the rails" real quick.

It takes a certain talent to write a commercial proposal. So it is better not to take the risk and ask writix.com/report-writing-service for professional help. The writers have enough experience to easily cope with this task.
It's incredibly interesting!
 

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This was a battle during the "Civil War" or "War for Southern Independence" as I prefer to call it. It occurred October 21, 1861 in the very northern part of Laurel County Kentucky. The Federal Troops had an encampment on the "Old Wilderness Road" to block entry of Confederate Troops to central Kentucky.
View attachment 30331
A batallion of about 600 Indiana Troops backed up by 1st Kentucky Cavalry (US) hurried to A steep hill called "Hoosier Knob" now and set up earthworks and Log fortifications. The Tennessee Confederate troops attempted to Attack up the steep hill but were repulsed due to Terrain and good fortifications.

It was about the same as the famous battle at Little Round Top but steeper. This hill is inaccessible on 2 sides due to a 20 ft cliff
View attachment 30329

and the Federal Army had managed to drag 2 Cannon to the top of the hill using 100 men and mules.
View attachment 30330
The Federals lost 5 KIA and the Confederates lost 11 KIA. Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer decided to withdraw back to Cumberland gap but a large trench system was Dug the next day in case the Confederates decided to return. The trenches are still clearly visible.
View attachment 30328

View attachment 30332
A rock shelter on the way to the top.
View attachment 30333
About 10 years after the battle the Confederate soldiers bodies were dug up ( from a mass grave) and moved to a Cemetary at Crab Orchard Ky about 25 miles away. There is a monument there and a ring of gravestones. I had photos of this but they were on Photobucket.
The next year, General Zollicoffer was killed at the Battle of Mill Springs as he tried to invade via Wayne county and Nancy Ky.
There is a Confederate cemetery and a monument at that location.
View attachment 30334
By the way, there was almost another battle "Here" as BLM was reported to be bringing 2 bus loads of "Protesters" to this site to overturn this monument. The Sheriff passed the word and about 400 Armed county Residents took up positions to keep this from happening. The Busses turned around and went back to Lexington.
This could have gone "off the rails" real quick.
WONDERFUL READ....THANK YOU....
The WORST war America has ever seen.Second only to the one we are fighting NOW.!!!!
 

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Confederate General Felix Zollicoffer decided to withdraw back to Cumberland gap but a large trench system was Dug the next day in case the Confederates decided to return. The trenches are still clearly visible.
I had never heard of the Battle of Mill Springs until I happened to stop there by chance, back in ‘99 when I was out exploring on my motorcycle. Interesting story and quite a tragedy, the way it all played out.
 

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There is a reenactment 2 day event held at wildcat every year ....check it out if you so inclined!
Until just now, I didn’t realize that I had replied to a post from 8 months ago. It is still interesting and I don’t remember seeing it back in May when JR originally posted
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
@CarlP right now is a perfect time for a visit to Wildcat Mountain. NO SNAKES are out and the visibility is good. Couple Fake Cannon and nice trail. Trench lines are still very visible as well as a section of the OLD Original Wilderness Road.
There is a spot below Berea Kentucky right beside US 25 that has a commemorative marker for "Boones Gap."
Wood Grave Cemetery Headstone Groundcover

Here is a section of the old wagon trail.
Natural landscape Wood Twig Trunk Grass

It would be a nice stop on the way. Stop and get Coyote George and his motorcycle and he will ride it through the Railroad Tunnel on the back wheel again. Maybe let your wife Marty ride on the handlebars also...
Jest sayin...

I have photos of Twin Tunnels which is on the main line L n N RR but can't locate them. Very close to Lee Bullock's house. Old boy met the Train there in the tunnel a few years ago while takin the short cut.
 

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@CarlP
I have photos of Twin Tunnels which is on the main line L n N RR but can't locate them. Very close to Lee Bullock's house. Old boy met the Train there in the tunnel a few years ago while takin the short cut.
I remember you talking about that. He was hunting mushrooms, as I recall.
 
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