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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a used Remington 1100 friday at Davi's guns in Raleigh. I took it out into the field at dawn Saturday, and it wouldn't cycle, so I called Davi's and talked to a manager, who said go ahead and bring it in on Tuesday.

Yesterday I talked to a gunsmith friend of mine on the north carolina predator hunters association website, who told me to take some steel wool and a bore brush and really clean the barrel well. He said to replace the O-ring too. He said that 90% of the guns that he fixes that won't cycle simply need a good cleaning.

Well I just got back from Davi's Guns in Raleigh. I told Dave the manager that it doesn't cycle, and that I had talked to a gunsmith friend of mine (thanks tr) who said that if I replace the O-ring and clean up the barrel it should cycle just fine. I told him that I'd be willing to pay for those minor repairs, but if that doesn't make the gun function properly, what should I do?

He handed me the card of a good gunsmith and told me that they would do absolutely nothing for me.

He said that the gun was sold 'as is.' I told him that nobody informed that I was buying it 'as is.' Nowhere does it say 'as is.' I told him that if I had known that as soon as I walked out the door, that I was "sorry out of luck," (and that's how I put it - we were both very polite to each other,) that I would not have bought the gun. I would not buy a gun from a gunshop 'as is.' He said that there is nothing that he can do, that it was sold as is, and that's that.

I told him that I'm former law enforcement, and an avid hunter, and I would be sure to mention to everybody I know that buys guns, just exactly how they treated me. I offered my hand and told him that I realize it's just their policy, and that it's nothing personal, but I still don't think it's right that they are not standing behind their product.

He just looked at my hand with disdain, started to stick his out, stopped, folded his hands, scowled at me, saw that I was still holding out my hand and smiling, and finally shook my hand. I told him that I was sorry that it worked out this way, but that I tried everything that I could to let them make it right, to no avail.

He had no reply to that, just scowled, and I left.

Maybe I should have gone in there on a Saturday when they were busy. But that's not really my style.

A couple of guys on the ncpha website have posted similar experiences there.

Well I guess I am still learning at age 50.
 

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1100's

Man that sucks..I'd tell everyone you know to not go there...
On the 1100..I have 2 and would buy more! The o ring is usually the culprit and I keep a couple on hand to change every few years. The ports that let gas escape can get plugged so check that..also clean the magazine tube around the oring as well...No oil either that makes it worse..Good Luck!!
 

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It happens, BUT...

I can see where the guy is coming from. We take in hundreds of used guns a year at our shop. We do not staff a gunsmith and don't work on them due to liability issues (thanks lawyers). We simply do not have time to function test every used gun that comes thru our door.

BUT!!!

We DO stand behind our guns. It is very infrequent that we get a used gun back that does not work. When we do and depending on the problem, we either take it to a local gunsmith or send it back to the factory for repair. We have to make it right so the customer leaves happy.That's just good customer service, and common courtesy.

Occasionally there are however some guns we sell "as is". They may be old guns that you can't get parts for, or maybe old guns with cracked stocks. All of those guns are labeled clearly for the buyer. No surprises. We sell a few of these each year as "wall hangers".

I guess you've learned from your mistake and will find better places to shop.

Charlie
 

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I agree with your friend the gunsmith that more than likely the shotgun needs a complete cleaning. Along with polishing and cleaning the chamber, polish the magazine tube, and I would replace the steel rings as well as the o-ring, they do wear out(kit with all three is about $24). Clean the inside of the barrel extension where the gas port is and also clean the gas port. Remove the butt stock and clean the action spring housing and I would replace the action spring ($7) and the follower if it shows any wear on on side ($5-6). It is extremely sad the place you bought the shotgun from has no sense of "business" or is dumb enough to sell used firearms without testing them first.
I don't understand why the manager even had you come back to the store unless they consider it customer service to kick you in the pants in public instead of on the phone.
Charlie was posting at the same time- Their policy is how "Business" is handled.
 

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I shot have shot an 1100

For years. Not a big problem. Remove the barrel and look how the steel rings are in place and then on the instructions(this is a big culprit). Clean the ports with the correct size drill bit(with your hand). Use the steel wool on the tube where the rings fit(use a dry lube on this area). If hunting in rain then clean after with solvent then dry lube again. Then reassemble with first steel ring flat part on first then the other steel and you can see how it mates then the rubber O ring. If you want to clean the action and bolt this is easy also but sometimes it helps to be shown the first time.

LEN
 

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Rem. 1100

Jon,

On the strategic level, yes this is not the way to run a business. The
owner/manager thinks they are "saving" money selling "as is", but in
fact they are loosing business because of it. A prime example of "Penny
Wise, and Dollar Foolish".

On a tactical level, I purchased my first Rem. 1100, in 1966, and rode it
hard, and have put it away wet :) So there isn't much I haven't seen
that causes these shotguns to fail to cycle. I would bet you a dinner
at Arby's that the "return" spring, housing tube, and spring follower, in
the stock needs cleaning and/or replacement. In all likelihood, you are
going to find a rusty, gunky, mess in there. Be prepared for removing
the big slotted screw cap, that holds the stock to the action. It will
require a very large, fairly long shafted screw driver, and probably some
grunting, penetrating oil, and possible some profanity, to break it loose.
Almost to a person, when I hear complaints about Remington 1100's not
cycling, I ask if they have cleaned the "return" spring, and housing tube,
in the stock, the reply is "What tube, in the stock?".

And as already mentioned, take a small piece of wire, and clean out the gas
ports on the barrel. As for changing the rubber gas seal, if it looks "chewed
up", or checked, replace it...When you go to purchase a new one, buy a
couple. This is the only "regular" maintenance part on the 1100, so keep a
spare handy when afield.

In general, the 1100 likes to be kept clean, and lightly lubed. This system
allows a lot of gunk to migrate through the action, so regular cleaning is
required for reliable operation. The 1100 is not a shotgun for folks that
prefer not to spend time on firearms cleaning. I believe part of the bad
rap on the 1100 reliability is due to 870 owners upgrading to 1100's, and
then trying to maintain it like the 870. Pump guns tolerate a pile more
gunk than do semi-autos. The newer gas systems, do a better job of
containing the debris from barrel gases, so if one wants a lower maintenance
semi-auto shotgun, a newer Browning, Beretta, or Benelli, would be a better
choice. I have them, but there is just something about the way the
1100/11-87 fits me, that has me putting in the extra effort to hunt them,
and keep them cycling reliably.

Squeeze
 

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Dittos on a clean 1100 is a happy 1100.

As others have correctly pointed out, the 1100 likes to be clean. I've never worn out the metal rings in the gas actuator, but keeping the gas ports clean, and cleaning the gas actuator section before stowing the gun away was key.

Just to emphasize a point made by others; polishing the magazine tube with (0000) steel wool, and using a dry lube such as that provided by Hoppe's, works wonders.

I've only experienced new 1100s, but after a few thousand rounds, I never had to replace an O ring or the piston rings. However, replacement parts are cheap enough.

One other thing: In spite of supposedly being able to shoot a variety of loads ranging from light to heavy, my 3" 1100 would not alway cycle after it had been shot some (dirty) and a light target load was being fired. Cleaning would not always assure me I could get thru a round of skeet w/o it failing to feed, even if it was just cleaned. However, increasing the load to the next higher pressure (more shot or powder, etc.) seemed to eliminate cycling issues unless the gun got reeeeeaaaalllly dirty after a long afternoon of shooting.

As for the shop where you bought the gun...Jerks, for sure.

P.
 

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Sorry to hear you took it in the pants.

I've got 2 1100's, 11-48,11-87 and a new 105cti on the wish list after the first of the year- hooray for tax returns! All mine have been used hard over the years. My 11-87 just turned 16 and is still running on the original O-ring even after several thousand rounds- I started carrying a spare a couple years ago, I just want to see just how far this one will go. They are probably the most user friendly semi's out there when it comes to owner maintenance. I definitely agree with what everyone else has said about replacing the O-ring,cleaning gas ports and mag. tube, and piston.

One trick I've learned over the years to extend O-ring life is to soak it in ATF for a few minutes everytime you clean it- it keeps it soft and flexible and swells it a bit to keep a good seal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wow! Thanks for all the support guys. You make me feel like family.

I will definitely take all your advice as far as cleaning and maintaining my 1100.

Like Squeeze guessed, I am upgrading from an 870 (well actually I have 3 - one for turkeys, one for ducks, and one for crows) and I appreciate the tips on keeping the 1100 happy.

Believe it or not, I've never owned an autoloader before. I've had such great luck with Rems that I thought the 1100 would be the way to go, and I am glad that so many 1100 owners chimed in on how pleased they've been with them.

I'll be sure and let y'all know when I get it working like it should.

Thanks again,
Jon
 

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Ditton on keeping 'em clean. My 1965 1100 12ga must be different than most, I've never had a single cycling issue, even with shooting 1oz loads. I clean every 400 rounds or so. I like Berettas, but I like the look, feel and handling of the 1100s. A friend has a 28ga 1100 for skeet, it is just too much fun!
 

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gas ports

I would clean the gas ports in the barrel.....
I have used pipe cleaners....

one time I made a cleaner for the gas ports out of heavy dacron fishing line like 100 lb test and tied knots in it..........40 or 50 inches long....... would feed it through the ports and out the end of the barrel...... and pull both ends back and forth......... then you can figure out where to tie the knots......

clean the ports and replace the o-ring...... clean the outside of the magazine tube ........ and the gun should work.......

I have bought o-rings at the hardware store for a short term fix... and they worked OK if you can find the right size and thickness........ .

R
 

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Good to hear it!

Installed new O-ring from Brownell's, cleaned and lubed as per everybody's instructions, and the 1100 cycles and shoots great now.

Drew first blood with it this morning on the Jordan gamelands here in NC.

Thanks guys!

Jon
That gun will prolly outlast YOU! Nuttin wrong w/ an 1100. I forgot...What gauge was that gun?

P.
 

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The only time my 1100 let me down was because I was a young novice owner and hadn't cleaned it well. Once a year I dismantle mine and clean the ports, trigger assembly, and bolt. It has never failed me since I started doing this. Mine was bought when I was 15 yo in 1978 and has had several thousand rounds through it on the original O-rings. She is beginning to clank a little bit when cycling so maybe a new auto is in my future.

Remington has an exploded diagram of an 1100 on their website. I don't have the link right now, but go on there and look aropund in the manuals. I have the diagram taped above my reloading bench so I have a quick reference during my annual gun cleaning chores.

Tony
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
That gun will prolly outlast YOU! Nuttin wrong w/ an 1100. I forgot...What gauge was that gun?

P.
it's a 12 gauge. I own 3 870s, but this is my first 1100. I'm very happy with it now that I know a little more about it and have blooded it.

I'll be sure and keep it clean.


*edit*
Hey Bruce thank you for the manual; It came it in the mail today. I appreciate it.
 
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