Varmint Hunters Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi There. I'm new here. Sure looks like a great forum.
I need to start out with a question. A freind of mine has entrusted me with a pair of Browning A5's that belonged to his late father in law.
I went to a web site that had serial number info and have determined that the light 20 was made in 64 and the light 12 in 65.
I know the number of asterics (sp?) on the barrel denote the choke but can't remenmber the code. These each have 2. Any help there?
I don't know if it's appropriate to ask the value here but that's my other question. They have some minimal handling marks and do not have the original cartons but I believe they are unfired. I'd guess they'd be rated at 90%. Some fancy scroll work and gold triggers. Very pretty shotguns. I might buy them from him myself.Thanks for any input.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,581 Posts
Welcome.

The value of A5s is complicated. And determined by a couple of things with regard to the evolution of the design and place of manufacture. In brief with unintended mistakes:

The first guns can be recognised by the safety in front of the trigger guard. You have to press the bolt-release button to load the magazine. Also made by Remington.

The second guns moved the safety to behind the trigger guard. Still have to press the BR button to load the magazine. late 40s to late 50s.

The third guns eliminate the need to press the BR to load. End mid-60s I think.

The 4th guns change from knob pistol grip to square pistol grip and the stock material changes to lighter wood. Lightweight receiver becomes an option plus 3" chamber. These third generation guns were made in Belgium (best), Canada (Inglis - same people as made WW2 Brownings. Good guns but some forend wood problems) and Japan (not good, some cracked receivers and lots of forend problems).

I've found that Canadian guns have little collector value but good shooter value, the reliability is legendary. The Japanese guns can't take a pounding and have no collector value, I would pay no more than for a Remington 1100 in the same condition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for all the info. I was looking at auction arms and it looked like to me the 20 gauge had a substantially higher value IF you went by the prices on that web site. Possibly because there were fewer made??
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top