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I used a Chrony when developing.......

loads for NRA High Power Silhouette. Since I do not have ready access to a 500 plus meter range, it helped me develope basic scope settings once the data was fed through a Ballastic Program. Sure saved ammo andonly had minor scope adjustments once on the range during practice prior to the matches.

My old Chrony was shot off it's tripod by a moron that promised to replace it, but left the state before doing so. Considering buying a new one now since I am retuning several rifles for other purposes.

Whether or not owning one that will be used sparingly is really an individual choice. But as I said above, it sure can save ammo if the data is used correctly.
 

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I agree having a chrongraph even for intermittent use is a plus.Used in conjunction with the computer ballistics programs it allows you to rough in your long range stuff pretty close. I have also used the combination to match a given load to Burris Ballistic Plex scopes with good results. You will notice your loads don't often match the examples Burris gives you.
hotcap
 

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I like to have one for messing with loads, I dont use it every week but probably once a month or so in the summer months. I bought a $20.00 rifle hard case at Wally World, cut out the foam to hold the components of the chrono and the tripod, works for me.
 

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Chronograph?

Definitely agree with Mortis.

I use my Oehler chronograph when working up loads, and to check and make sure that my established loads are consistent.

When a change is made to any component, then it's back to the chronograph to see what the effect of the change is, and to record the results.

Load charts are good starting points, but every rifle behaves differently.

Not all chronographs are equal, suggest you ask and try before you buy if possible.

Bottom line, you can guess about how your load performs, or you can do the testing and be certain.

If you plan to shoot seriously, then a chronograph is probably in your future.
 

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Classify me as an "occasional chrony user"

But those three or 5 times a year when I do need it, it is worth every cent.

I think they are a must-have for any handloader. I have been surprised by high and low velocity shown on the chronograph often.... that I would never have thought possible.

Also, knowing extreme spreads, and not just velocity, is important. As is knowing what your loads do in 30 degree weather vs. 90 degree temps.
 

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Sometimes.

I work my loads 100% for accuracy with disregard of velocity readings, in other words I go by the target. Then when settled on a load, I shoot the rifle at ranges from 50 to as far as 400 yards in 50 yard increments depending on the rifle and it's use and make a chart of the trajectory and stick it on the scope.
That is the most accurate way to find the curve of a firearm in my opinion. Now, depending on your testing methods, some require a chronograph like the Audette Ladder which is supposed to be very reliable. I do realize that not all shooters are blessed with facilities to shoot at long range and in that case a chrono can help save your bacon and give you a rough idea of what the rifle will shoot, trajectory wise. I used to use mine all the time till I discovered that the chrongraph and ballistics program varied a lot from the actual walk and shoot method. When I have a target in my hand and the group is 3 1/2" low at 300, it's pretty hard to argue the gun shoots 3 1/2 low at 300 regardless to what the program says.
I feel that the actual velocity of a given rifle is just a number, some are high and some are low. I've also seen where the lowest S.D. did not translate into the best shooting group.
I guess you could say I don't use mine much, only to satisy curiosities as to what speed a certain load is running which is seldom. The grounghogs and deer don't seem to care, nor do the paper targets. But I may not be using mine to it's fullest potential?
 

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You'll probably wind up using it more than just once in awhile.....like every time working up load. Also to find out what's happening with existing loads. There's just no way to really tell what's really going on without a chronograph, and the results can be surprising. Get a Pact Pro and it'll also printout trajectory using any combination you want.
 
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