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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
If you could have a rig dedicated only to hunting, what would you have?
My hunting trucks have always been my daily drivers as well and as such there was never much modification done to them. I'm thinking about a dedicated rig now and I'm trying to decide what I want, versus, what I need.

There is a early eighties vintage K5 Blazer sitting down the road for real cheap, so if I start with that as a base, what would you add to make it a good hunting rig.

This rig would only be "off road" on two tracks and forest service roads. NO EXTREME 4WD STUFF. No deep mud either.
I'm thinking a full overhaul of the drive train for dependability.
Front and rear diffs?
Maybe upgraded ball joints etc.
CB radio
Fold down cot in the rear for not more than two nights at a time.
Tires? Upsize? lug? (probably just regular mud and snows)
Storage compartments?
Roof rack
Chains
Bumper upgrade for high lift jack?
winch
Extra lights?

What else or what shouldn't be on this list?
 

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Mite want 2nd Battery...Cheap Ins.

If there's room under the Hood. Other then that I think you have it covered pretty good. I'm sure some others will think of something . Russ.
 

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If you could step up to a late 80's or early 90's...

I think that you would have a lot better vehicle. Also, I prefer a pickup with a camper shell on the back to a Suburban type of vehicle...just my personal preference. I have a habit of cutting a hole in the top of the camper shell to shoot out of, installing a hatch to cover the hole. Shooting rails around the edges also really help out.

Chevy Trucks in the late 80's and early 90's sure do have a lot better suspension and get a lot better gas milage. A hunting partner of mine had an 85 Chevy and that truck made my back hurt after a 3 day hunt. Another guy on our team had an 87 or 89 Chevy that was a dream to ride in, gas milage was super.
 

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Aux. backup lights are nice to have off road. Not just for backing up, but mine have been great for skinning or setting up camp in the dark (I've got a pair of KC 55w floodlights).

And I don't think you can have too many 12v outlets either, for charging batteries and what not. Having one or two of them back in the cargo or tailgate area can be real handy.

Some sort of GPS is a must have for me too.

Since you are thinking recovery with the hi lift and winch etc., I'd make sure you have some sort of compressor - whether it be portable 12v or some sort of built-in onboard air. Another piece of recovery gear would be a land anchor of some sort to go with the winch. This is a must have for the country I spend a lot of time in (might not be important if you usually have trees to anchor on). Cheapest would be some T posts, rope and a sledge hammer. Most expensive would be a Pull Pal. All kinds of things in between. And of course, don't forget to carry a shovel :).

Tools are always nice to have. I like to keep a set just for each rig, in it's own bag, for extended forays.

If you do go with a Blazer, I've seen several where guys have put in big roof hatches. REAL good for night hunting, or prairie dog shooting etc. If you go that route, be sure and wire up some 12v power outlets within easy reach of the hatch.

- DAA
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
keith,
I had thought about cutting a hatch in the top of it. I'd also considered a pickup, but don't see much difference between a truck with cap and the blazer. I'm not convinced it matters, but the blazer offers better access to stuff in the back than the truck. That's about the only diff. I can come up with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
DAA,
I made a backup light for my regular blazer. It mounted in the trailer hitch and plugged into the trailer receptacle. Now they sell them in Cabelas for $30.
Another idea I should have patented.
 

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Keep in mind you cant shoot ANY WILDLIFE whatsoever from inside your truck anywhere in Wyoming, so the hole in the roof might be sorta wasted.

I favor a pickup, I can haul stuff in it without stinking up the inside of the cab, such as for instance a smelly old pronghorn. I can get it as dirty as I want and just hose it out when it gets too bad. I have a little '92 Toyota pickup with 145,000 on it and has never let me down (knock on wood :D ) and goes anywhere I want to go.

A good survival kit tailored for Wyoming conditions is mandatory. Do some thinking on this, dont scrimp, put in lots of stuff!! A little air compressor and an inverter are mighty handy. Plugin spot light for nightime emergencies. After a few trips you'll know more about what you need.
 

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I hunt pretty close to you, and know that a normal 2wd road can turn into an extreme 4wd road in a hurry. I'd lift it and get some of those "extreme terrain" tires.
 

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My huntin' rig.......

Here's my daily driver....plus my huntin' truck...'98 Taco....V6 w/five speed stick & 4wd....BFG TAs...well maintained w/118K miles...always have jumpers...jacks...two spares with tire chains mounted...3/8" x 20' tow chain....2x6 scraps...GPS & cell phone w/DC cords...tools..extra clothes..still try to keep it nice..but mud washes off...dependable ride to remote Utah...
 

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Early 80's Toyota (pic)

First off they are simple machines, which means in the field a break down does not strand you for long periods. Second they will go any were within reason. Last they are easy on the gas bill.



Here is mine, this thing does not know the meaning of die, 400,000 + miles


 

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If'n when I get my dedicated rig, it will be as light as I possibly can make it. I've had my eye on a Chevy Tracker with the 4 banger for a while. You don't need much in the way of power and all that if you go over the snow and mud, rather than through it.

I've been passed too many times by little Jeep / tracker / bronco II type vehicles put-putting along, zigging and zagging around the holes and over the drifts, when my heavy full size type trucks have to go through. JMO, Dutch.
 

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fuel injection.....

whatever you get make sure it is fuel injected. So much less maintenance and superior gas mileage, plus when your out where it is colder than hell all the time it just makes more sense than a carbed unit........next would be a joeniv-esk survival kit.
 

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yessssss!!!!!

When all else fails.....overbuild it.....thats my excuse to my wife anyway.:)
 

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I knew it!!

I knew I'd regret selling my '89 S10 Blazer. Bought a new car and turned my '04 4Runner into the (mostly) dedicated hunting truck, and 2 weeks ago sold the Blazer (which had been the hunting truck) to a friend. I agonized about it as it was one of those "go anywhere and don't worry about it" vehicles (though not entirely reliable!). Looking at this thread makes me think about all the great things I could have done to that truck, cheaply, that I don't dare do to a nearly new 4Runner!
 

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set of good year wrangler MTR tires.friend has these on his truck.says he doesnt need to put chains on in the wind river mountains to get around/climb.
i have firestone destination M/T tires on my dodge.they grip very well in snow,mud.
 
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