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I have some 220Swift reloads that i carried to wyoming about five years ago. Never had a problem with them there or around home since as i occasionally shoot crows around home. Yesterday I was at DNR range to let my grandson bust a few caps and lo and behold I couldn't get them to chamber, same rifle, same reloads. Seems to be an ever so slight bulge right at the large diameter where the shoulder starts. I'm not exactly new at this reloading thing so this has got me buffaloed. Mostly I just try to neck size with a full length die (I guess it's more like partial sizing) and these have not been reloaded over 4 or 5 times. Now for the ignorant part--if I ream the neck on a die for bullet clearance, remove the decapping rod, can I safely bump the shoulder on these loaded rounds, or am I asking for disaster? About 300 rounds I guess and I sure hate to pull that many bullets. Anyone have any experience at this? I know this may sound stupid so feel free to light me up. Sorry about the length and thanks, DN.:confused:
 

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No idea what happend either, just guessing where the compressed loads ?

As far as bumping the shoulder back on a loaded round. I myself would not touch them with a 10' pole, I get nervous enough decapping live primers, but with a fully loaded case inside a chamber ( the die) things could get ugly fast. Just not worth it in my opinion
 

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If -U- can get a Body Die

May -B-possible 2 do what U want. I have done this in the past on a few cases, just make sure U lube well tho. I have some 20+ yrs old reloads that shot just fine, well at least they went Bang when I pulled the trigger.
 

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FL bushing die (sans bushing) or body die!

I have had to do what you are contemplating twice; once for some .223s fired and neck sized (only) for another rifle, and a few rounds for a 220 Swift.

I would NOT recommend using a standard die with the bullets still in the case neck. After all, the die is designed to size the neck way down to be opened to the correct ID with the expander. Running loaded rounds thru a standard FL die with the bullet seated is going to really put some pressure on everything.

If you don't have one, I would recommend a Redding body die from you favorite vendor (Sinclair has most everything). It will resize the body and bump the shoulder and not touch the neck/bullet.

One last thought... If the necks have stretched too long, the constriction of the chamber at the mouth of the case could be at play. This would be a serious safety issue if the round is fired. Otherwise, if the rounds were pushed but refused to chamber, perhaps the bulging is result of the neck being forced back toward the shoulder, causing the shoulder to collapse?? (Yeah, I'm grabbing at straws here:rolleyes:)

Bottom line: My favorite remedy would be the body die. It will do the resizing w/o constricting the neck further. And, it is open at the top! (read: not an enclosed chamber situation - not that there is any particular danger here...)

FWIW,

P.
 

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I have similar problem with a couple hundred win 22-250 cases. I was neck sizing with my forster die and decided to full length resize on the 3 firing with my Forster full length die. My rifle is a Shilen built Rem 700 with a minimum chamber and now the cases will not chamber. I set the die a little to deep and put the very slightest bulge at the shoulder. I am fairly sure these would chamber in a factory rig but they are too tight in mine.
I replaced the brass with new Nosler brass ( very nice by the way ) and I'll try to figure out something for this other brass.
 

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I've done it when I used ammo that was loaded for a rifle I had sold and subsequently needed to use the ammo in another rifle.

I used the Redding body die that another poster mentioned above.

Worked like a champ and was quick.
 

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Check the neck length.

Like Paul said it could be that the necks needed triming and they are long enough to prevent chambering the round. Just a guess but better safe than sorry.
 
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