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I am putting on an older stock on my Remington 700 in .17 Rem. This stock has been bedded already for another gun. I bought it very reasonable and going to use it as my hunting stock. I may camo it later, but I can do that myself as it is not as pretty as the one I am taking off. My question is, even though the action fits in the stock, would it be best to take some bedding out and rebed it to this action? I freefloated the stock already. Whoever had the stock before had a pressure point at the front of the stock. If anyone is looking for a nice stock my ad may still be in the classified section. Darrel
 

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Darrel, Regardless of how well a quality control works, no two actions are going to be identical in measurement.

The one factor in bedding as you well know, is for the action to conform to the stock with little too no play.

I'd shoot the rifle first to see if it is holding as well as the previous stock. If the deviation spreads some, then rebedding could be in order. Also, is it pillar bedded? If not, be something to consider adding to the equation.

Just my nickles worth.
 

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I would re-bed it...

You can always drop it in there and shoot it "as is" and see how you like it. But, any mass-produced gizmo is made to fit w/in a "window" of tollerance. In short, it may or may not be a good fit, it for sure won't be exact, and it is soooo easy to re-bed it that personally, I wouldn't give re-bedding a second thought before it was done!

It would depend on what the bedding compound was as to whether to grind it out and start over or to just rough it up and skim bed it. If it was JB Weld, except for the recoil lug recess, I'd just rough up the surface areas* and skim bed it. A competition rifle might be a "glue-in" bedding job, but otherwise, simply putting a bed under the front receiver ring/recoil lug area running up to the edges of the stock rails, and a bedding under the tang contact area around the rear guard screw is all that is required. Just make sure the tang or anything else but the recoil lug is not "captured" or there will be trouble.

So, like I said, the effort is minimal and the confidence and potential of a fresh bedding job far outweigh the concern or cost of the effort (BTW, JB Weld is steel impregnated (read: won't shrink), nearly impervious to solvents and certainly oils, and can be had at most all hardware and auto parts places for about $6 and be enough to bed half a dozen rifles!)

It has taken me almost as long to answer your question as it would for me to have that suckah ground and bedded. It could be curing right now!:D

P.
 

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You want clearance on all sides of the recoil lug except the rear, where it should firmly contact the bedding. A lot of folks taper the sides of the recoil lug so it will slip into and out of the mortise more easily, also. Do that AFTER you bed it.

Use release agent for ALL bedding compounds, unless you want the gun permanently assembled! There are bedding instructions in the Tech Section, or I can send some if you e-mail me.
 

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What you don't want is anything but the recoil lug to be captured, i.e., prevented from moving. Trim/grind the epoxy from around the edges of the tang and rearward of it to a couple mm or so, if not flat.

As far as relieving the area around the recoil lug goes, convention has it that the only surface touching is the rearward facing surface. All other surfaces are ground back. But, having said that, I'll share something with you that Allan Weldy and I have been discussing:

We both have shot newly bedded rifles before and after relieving the sides and bottom of the recoil lug. Neither of us felt the rifles were more accurate after having been relieved, and we each had an example where we felt at least one rifle shot better before relieving the lug...possibly. I mean, after all...What is a glue-in but a fully epoxied action sans any relieving after the fact!?

Upon consulting some well respected smiths, the unscientific consensus was that if the action was not removed after bedding, then the recoil lug would not benefit by relieving it. Only if the action is removed for whatever reason, THEN the recess should be relieved to prevent ANY epoxy shavings from getting packed in the lug well.

That make perfect sense to me. If one uses a good release agent, there is no reason to pull a gluing apart, unless one is just dying to see if there are any air holes in the bedding job. (Such holes might mean something to a client, but unlikely to affect accuracy, unless there was a huge gap between the receiver and epoxy...Which there won't be, for anyone that has done a couple bedding jobs.)

Hope this helps!

P.
 

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What you don't want is anything but the recoil lug to be captured, i.e., prevented from moving. Trim/grind the epoxy from around the edges of the tang and rearward of it to a couple mm or so, if not flat.

As far as relieving the area around the recoil lug goes, convention has it that the only surface touching is the rearward facing surface. All other surfaces are ground back. But, having said that, I'll share something with you that Allan Weldy and I have been discussing:

We both have shot newly bedded rifles before and after relieving the sides and bottom of the recoil lug. Neither of us felt the rifles were more accurate after having been relieved, and we each had an example where we felt at least one rifle shot better before relieving the lug...possibly. I mean, after all...What is a glue-in but a fully epoxied action sans any relieving after the fact!?

Upon consulting some well respected smiths, the unscientific consensus was that if the action was not removed after bedding, then the recoil lug would not benefit by relieving it. Only if the action is removed for whatever reason, THEN the recess should be relieved to prevent ANY epoxy shavings from getting packed in the lug well.

That make perfect sense to me. If one uses a good release agent, there is no reason to pull a gluing apart, unless one is just dying to see if there are any air holes in the bedding job. (Such holes might mean something to a client, but unlikely to affect accuracy, unless there was a huge gap between the receiver and epoxy...Which there won't be, for anyone that has done a couple bedding jobs.)

Hope this helps!

P.
I usually put two layers of masking tape on the front, sides, and bottom of the recoil lug then coat with release agent to give clearance. This a good idea or not?
 

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Comment on Paul's comments

Paul and I have compared notes on fully bedding the recoil lugs----specifically Rem actions.

If a person has any doubts about this, I'd suggest following the advice of the best professional gun smiths-----provide clearance everywhere but the rear surface of the lug. You'll never get into trouble with method. This method is used by the best in the business and is part of many fine rifles----can't be bad.

Mike Bryant commented on this some time ago and I hope not to misquote him. His comments were that its possible for tightly bedded lugs to shave epoxy in the lug's cavity when installing the barreled action----these shavings could accumulate under the lug and prevent the action from being pulled down solidly into the bedding.

I've tried to get around this by grinding out the bottom of the lug cavity after the bedding job----makes a little more space for any shavings so they won't interfere with the action being pulled down into the bedding.

I've continued to use the fully bedded lugs and like this method. Others prefer the more conventional method.

I have no interest in winning converts over to the fully bedded method---just mentioned it for information. Bed with your preferred method and enjoy a better rifle.

A. Weldy
 

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I usually put two layers of masking tape on the front, sides, and bottom of the recoil lug then coat with release agent to give clearance. This a good idea or not?
Tape will give you the clearance you need w/o having to later grind out the epoxy to relieve the lug. That method works good and is used by many pros as well.

P.
 

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lug clearance

I have always done the same as Crowhunter. Tape all surfaces of the lug except the rear with electrical tape. Then remove tape after bedding cures. Seems to work for me.
hotcap
 
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