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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don’t if I can help it. For example, I loaded my PD 223 AI loads with H335 and it drops x volume very consistently and In my case, with a Dillon 550 setup. However, when the need arises to weigh charges this is my setup. Basically, an old fashion balance beam that is elevated to reduce the parallax and a magnifying glass to add a bit more precision to the reading. Questions and comments welcomed.
27317

Thx
 

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I used a Belding&Mull for a long time as far as powder measures go. Honestly the only one I trust for any powder, though it’s will still weigh every now and then.
To hornery old farts I hang around with got one of the RCBS electronic scale/trickler/measures. I used it a few times and had to have one. Saves a huge amount of time when doing load work. I check it on a regular basis still, I just don’t 100% trust electronics. It has made a big difference it seems with my small cases like the 17FB.
 

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Very similar set-up. Dillon 550B press and Dillon powder measures which are very consistent, especially with ball, flake powders and short stick powders. I stay away from long or very thick stick powders like IMR 4064 and IMR 4350. I use a Dillon beam balance (Dillon branded but made by Ohaus) to use to set charges and check charges while reloading. I also have a very inexpensive electronic balance that I use for bullet weighing, not powder. Also have a full set of calibration weights that can be used on either balance.
 

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I drop from a Harrell measure one click short of what I want into a pan and weigh on a Gem Pro 250 and trickle up to what I want. This is done at home. At the range I tune with my Beggs Barrel tuner. We nicknamed the Lyman trickler/scale the Liar Measure. We have a Pact scale/trickler but it is slower than the dump and weigh method.
 

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If loading in volume for a Pdog trip, a RCBS Lite and I check every "n" charge on the 505.

If just testing out a new/different powder or load data, I use the 505, with a cheapo Lenovo 8" tablet set up to remove the parallax issue and makes seeing the pointer easier to see with these crappy eyes I got. I use an old computer desk with two levels, the 505 sits on the higher shelf. I use the Lee Scoops to get close, and a collegiate shot glass to "trickle" up to the desired charge. :sneaky:
 

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Ohaus 1010 Scott Parker tuned, Harrells then recently picked up a Dial O Grain which I will check against the 1010, selling the 1010 if it passes muster. I had the RCBS automatic thrower but trickling up took too long w the variation in throws. I did not try the straw mod. I still have an auto Pact but haven't used it yet.
 

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Since 1976 I have used my RCBS Uniflow powder measure and 5-10 scale. I set the powder measure to throw 0.1 gr. light and trickle the rest into the case. I have used that measure for so long I can throw consistent charges with it very well.
 

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I've been using an Ohaus 10-0-5 balance-beam scale for the past 50 years as well. I use a set of Lee powder scoops for the initial throw, then finesse with a trickler.

It's slow, but I load so many varieties of weights and powders and in such small 20-round batches that using a powder measure designed for large-number production wouldn't be worth it.

My current loads range from 6 grains of Lil Gun in a 5mm Remington Magnum rimfire-converted-to-centerfire to 40+ grains of 4350 in the .220 Swift and .243 Winchester.

Works for me.
 

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I have a gempro 250 for final weights. I use a RCBS charge master, Harrels, Hornady, or Redding powder throw and fine tune on the gempro for most of my rifle loading.

I try to get loads worked up with powders for high volume rounds I can throw from the Harrels into the case.
 

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Always interesting to see what others use.

When it comes to weighing charges for competition, I use a precision digital weighs to 0.02gn. Or, in the field (at a match) I use the Harrel thrower if I need to tweak a load for match conditions.

But, for PDs, I throw powder charges after working them up with a scale. And, Vitavori (fine grain) powders throw very consistently - so much so that once I've established where the charge weight vs. velocity plateaus - I don't have to worry about ± 0.1 and the Harrel (for small charges) or the RCBS BR2 (large cases) does the job.
 

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I have found that the Dillon powder measures are very consisten also. For ball or very short stick poowders will typically keep What PAul said, ±0.1 grain. Don't like to crunch/crush long sticks or very thick sticks so I don't use them. I don't do BR competition, just normal target and PD loading.
 

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For everything I use an RCBS Charge Master and a Dillon manual scale. I throw and then verify...sorry, I don't trust the tech - though, to date, it's been trust worthy. That failure in time thing is always nagging me...When it comes to my heavy barrels, I throw short and trickle in. I am going to put a magnifying glass in front of the scale - Brilliant!
 

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I experienced a really dangerous "malfunction" while working up loads for a Rem 7mm Mag, measuring on a 505 scale.
The scale uses the two poles of a magnet acting on a copper plate positioned on the end of the balance beam. (I'm sure most of y'all have used one with the same "eddy current" dampers.)
Trough NO FAULT OF THE SCALE, the day before I had been grinding some metal parts clamped in a vise on my loading bench. And, as result, some of the metal filings attached to the magnetic poles of my powder scale, forming little "whiskers" though which the scale's copper damper plate would pass when settling out. This resulted dragging on the balance beam, and the drag varied enough that I inadvertently added more powder to get the beam to reach the "zero" mark.
At the range, my friend was trying to do a "ladder test" (a series of rounds with progressively heavier charges, looking for a plateau point). But, there was NOTING resembling a progressive "trail" up the paper. Shots were all over the place - making NO sense at all. And, then the bolt jammed shut - indicative of a severe over load. I had to hammer the bolt open in order to extract the spent case! WTF???
Obviously, something was amiss with the weights. And, because the lighting wasn't all that good, it took a while to discover the little whiskers of metal bridging the space between the damper magnet poles. (I was really scratching my head, trying to find out what was dragging on the balance beam - before I saw the whiskers dragging on the copper damper plate. Dayam!!!)

Well, we started over with the load workup which was successful. And he got his elk that fall with no further issues with the gun or the ammo. I now LOOK at the gap between the magnetic poles (where the damper plate passes) every time before proceeding to weigh loads. We got lucky!
 

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I experienced a really dangerous "malfunction" while working up loads for a Rem 7mm Mag, measuring on a 505 scale.
The scale uses the two poles of a magnet acting on a copper plate positioned on the end of the balance beam. (I'm sure most of y'all have used one with the same "eddy current" dampers.)
Trough NO FAULT OF THE SCALE, the day before I had been grinding some metal parts clamped in a vise on my loading bench. And, as result, some of the metal filings attached to the magnetic poles of my powder scale, forming little "whiskers" though which the scale's copper damper plate would pass when settling out. This resulted dragging on the balance beam, and the drag varied enough that I inadvertently added more powder to get the beam to reach the "zero" mark.
At the range, my friend was trying to do a "ladder test" (a series of rounds with progressively heavier charges, looking for a plateau point). But, there was NOTING resembling a progressive "trail" up the paper. Shots were all over the place - making NO sense at all. And, then the bolt jammed shut - indicative of a severe over load. I had to hammer the bolt open in order to extract the spent case! WTF???
Obviously, something was amiss with the weights. And, because the lighting wasn't all that good, it took a while to discover the little whiskers of metal bridging the space between the damper magnet poles. (I was really scratching my head, trying to find out what was dragging on the balance beam - before I saw the whiskers dragging on the copper damper plate. Dayam!!!)

Well, we started over with the load workup which was successful. And he got his elk that fall with no further issues with the gun or the ammo. I now LOOK at the gap between the magnetic poles (where the damper plate passes) every time before proceeding to weigh loads. We got lucky!
In a post above, you can see the balance beam scale with that same magnetic damper.
Tableware Countertop Green Home appliance Sewing machine
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
This resulted dragging on the balance beam, and the drag varied enough that I inadvertently added more powder to get the beam to reach the "zero" mark.
Paul, that’s an interesting story. If I may suggest please purchase check weights and make the use of those a part of your routine for preparing to charge cases. I’ll be glad to elaborate further if you are interested to explain if you’re interested.
 
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