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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have included a link that explains the Red Wolf history better than I could write it. I will suffice it to say that the Red Wolf was classified as an endangered species in 1967. In the 70's the Red Wolf recovery program was in full swing. The concerns over even being remotely capable of saving the genetics of the Red Wolf was the chief concern at this time. There were those that did not even believe that the Red Wolf would be able to survive as a distinct species in the wild due to it's propensity to breed with other canids.

As such, I can't see any logic in attempting to release the pure Red Wolves back into the wild. Most of that decade was spent attempting to identify which wolves were genuine and which were a hybridization of other species, whether the eastern grey wolf or the coyote. "Only 17 of the 400 were determined to be full blooded red wolves and they were used to establish the captive breeding program (Nickens 1992)."

This does beg the question as to what happened to the remaining 383 mixes that were captured and deemed unworthy for the captive breeding program. I don't think it intentional for the government to release these back into the wild since the hybrids were some of the cause of the problem in the first place, but I surely could not speak for every individual within the system.

Another possibility for the "sightings" of these animals in Kentucky and the Carolinas during that time frame (70's) and so forth could possibly be due to the pressure of the attempts to capture the remaining wild red wolves. The capturing efforts were predominantly in Texas and Lousiana. However, a few wolves or hybrids may have been pushed into that region and found a home there. I don't know if that could ever be ascertained.

But, have a look at this photo below. I would say that one picture is worth a thousand words, but these days it could be said to be worth a thousand lies. Anyway, this "coyote" was claimed to have been killed somewhere in the northeast. When I look at it, I see very thick legs and as well as the large mass. If this photo is at all genuine, then I would tend to believe that it has to be at least some part wolf....or someone's dog.




For the complete article...
http://www.wolfsongalaska.org/red_wolf.html
 

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That is a large dog. They do grow larger in the North East. I have seen some large coyote's here in the Catskill Mountains. They are geting to be a real problem. The deer heard is down noticably. This years deer take was terrible. You never see any ruffed grouse any more. Small dogs and cats that run at large do not do so for long! They have gotten so bold that a pheasant preserve near here releases birds on Saturdays and the coyotes during the release run right out into the field and grab the birds in broad day light.
 

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Hey Steve,

Way back in High School in the late 80's our biology teacher took us all on a field trip to the red wolf sanctuary near St. Louis. Even then with full program running they only had like 20 wolves. They said they couldnt release them yet as there habitat was too overpopulated with people. Even as a "dumb kid" I could not see the reason "WHY". They indicated there was not enough genetic material to keep from inbreeding. I wonder whatever happened to those people and their dubious program. I guess I will have to google it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ironic

They said they couldnt release them yet as there habitat was too overpopulated with people.
If they truly believed that, then why were they there? It's odd thatwe don't see the tree hugger crowd too willing to be the first to take the plunge to give up their space so that the precious animals can survive. Things that just make ya' wonder.
 

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Steve

I sent you a personal mail.:D
 

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Just like those "people"

If they truly believed that, then why were they there? It's odd thatwe don't see the tree hugger crowd too willing to be the first to take the plunge to give up their space so that the precious animals can survive. Things that just make ya' wonder.
That are so opposed to all forms of logging, even though it is a renewable resource. You dont see them framing with steel studs! Or wiping with cotton rags either! Just cant win. I lost the best job I ever had because the mill could not get logs. Every time the FS opened a logging operation it was slapped with a Desist order by a judge. The taxpayers have to pay for the defense of all these injunctions. But I guess this is all old news. Just buy wood from Canada and put me out of work.:mad:
 

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Thanks Hondo

That is good to know. How did you find out that they were still in operation? It sure was a long time ago; but I seem to recall they were going to release them in the Smokey Mountains? Does that ring a bell?
 
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