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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I believe these are the same scales, under the covers. Is there any detail
differences, like case design, etc., that make the Denver Instruments MXX-123
better than the Acculab VIC-123, or vice versa?

From my web searches, I can get a MXX-123 for $275 + SH, or a VIC-123
for $246 + SH. If there is no difference, I guess I will save $25 and get
the VIC-123.

Squeeze

P.S. FWIW, I screwed up an started this thread in the "Firearms" forum. Since I
don't know how to move threads, or even if I can, I deleted it in the "Firearms" forum,
and put it where it should have been originally
 

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Don't know about the difference, if any. But I doubt you need a scale that good (expensive) at all. Any of the PACT or Dillon models are more accurate than you need to weigh brass, bullets or even powder if you follow the directions.
 

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The vic and MX series are both same scales made by sister companies if DI.

I sell the DI MXX123 for 255.00 shipped if you are interested.
 

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Don't know about the difference, if any. But I doubt you need a scale that good (expensive) at all. Any of the PACT or Dillon models are more accurate than you need to weigh brass, bullets or even powder if you follow the directions.

Rocky,

I would agree if all one was doing was loading for a dog town or yotes but for long range competition to have a scale that is 5x more accurate and is true to it's reading is vital if you plan to compete and win.

I tested loads from a RCBS scale to precision weighed charges from my DI TR 603-d and my groups at 600 yds were over 1" smaller with the precise weighed charges.
Got almost same results using a 10-10 scale and had noticed that these scales tend to stick alot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The reason

Rocky,

I have a Cabelas, and it has been pretty decent for repeatability, until
recently. Occasionally it wants to get out of calibration, or looses
zero, or just starts to hunt around with a few grains of offset. If I
get it calibrated, and it warms up, and the moon is in the right quarter,
it stays within +/- .1 grain. I am not amused. I figure since I am feeling
like I need to purchase another one, I may as well go for more than
+/- .1 digit accuracy. I think I learned my lesson about scales AGAIN.
I paid with shipping and tax, about $100, for this Cabelas electronic,
and here I am again looking for a new/better scale. Which looks to
again be in the $100 range, at a minimum. That would almost have
paid for the MXX-123, and I am sure that I would have been happier
with the performance, over the last couple of year, that I owned the
Cabelas.

James, how do I get in touch with you.

Squeeze
 

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Ahhh. I see.

Well, you apparently DO fall into the one or two percent of reloaders who MIGHT benefit.

FWIW, my RCBS powder system (the older one) will also hunt and drift a bit on occasion. I believe I've convinced myself that it's primarily due to radio wave fields nearby. My former neighbor's HAM outfit gave my scale fits, for example. So does our own clothes dryer, oddly. With wireless routers, TVs, microwave ovens, communications radios and such virtually everywhere, I'm not surprised that any precision but inexpensive device like digital scales can be affected.
 

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I am sure that I would have been happier
with the performance, over the last couple of year, that I owned the
Cabelas. Squeeze
I can chime in here on the DI MXX-123 (I bought from James, BTW). It is one of those "Ah-HA!" moments in my reloading for precision. Once I had the scales, I can tell you it was very enlightening to see what kind of variances I was getting with an Ohas 505 scales, and the 3BR, and a Harrell throwers. For example, I found the ES of my beloved Harrells thrower to be over .5 gn when throwing N133!! I suspected something like that from results form Audette Ladder testing, but I was shocked to see the ES that high.

I have found that it is more important to be precise in everything, especially powder charges, when in the development phase of load development. This is because we find ourselves working between barrel harmonic nodes and on the steep side of the powder load/pressure curve. I don't know yet what all the ramifications will be, but it appears a great deal of the ambiguity and frustration encountered in load development was due in no small part to variances in powder charges. I can see a significant improvement in consistancy during Audette Ladder tests as well as traditional load development.

The DI MXX-123 was my personal favorite, best improvement in precision shooting for 2006.

P.
 
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