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I am considering turning necks on some of my factory rifle brass. I have looked at the hand held units, Sinclair, Forster & K&M. I have also considered the RCBS unit with autofeed that mounts on the hand cranked Trim Pro unit. Does the RCBS unit do a good enough job or should I stick with the more expensive and slower hand held units?
I have posted a Want to Buy in the classifieds.
 

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My experience has been that the hand held turners limit overdoing the removal of metal and can be controlled better. However, others here with more experience with the RCBS type units may have better info. I use the Sinclair and K&M units. I turn necks for my 224 Clark.
 

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I like the K&M and use power to turn the cases

I hand hold the tool and chuck up the case holder in a power screwdriver or an 18V drill. Really speeds up the process and the first cut usually makes one continuous pigtail... :)
I go a bit slower on the final cut.
Are you really sure you want to turn necks for a factory chamber? Lots of work with very little if any gain.
Mike
 

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K&M Turner?

Can you post a link for the K&M turner? I'm not familiar with them. I've looked at the Forster and read the reviews - seems most prefer the hand-held vs. the case trimmer add-on type. I will need to turn the necks for a 260×444 improved and currently in the market for a case neck turner.
 

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I use the K&M turner for my 30BR. I chuck up the case holder in a cordless hand held drill, and spin the case that way, rather than rotating the cutter assembly. Very quick and not tiring at all.
 

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I don't know that they have a website, but if you google

it as K&M Neck Turner, you'll get a bunch of his on use, reviews and where you can purchase one.
 

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Since my cartridge .260×444 improved is based on the .444 Marlin, I would need a shell holder for the .444 right?

Also, I fighting over thick brass in the neck when necking down. Here are my steps:

375 JDJ FL
.308 Neck size
6.5-06 AI (cut down to match my chamber)

At the the .308 step, the expander is sticking in the neck of the sized case due to overthick. Should I turn at the this stage first? It looks like the K&M pilot with the reaming flutes would be an ideal tool to remove the overthick brass at this stage, should I resize to .308 with the expander removed, turn the neck, then re-size again wih the expander inserted? I guess I could turn again at the final .260 stage for concentricity. What are your thoughts?
 

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Necking 444's

When I form cases for my 309 JDJ, I run them through a Hornady 308 FL die first. I don't do anything else except fireform them. Maybe you can skip the 375 step and that might eliminate the sticking problem. I use Hornady one-shot lube and have not ruined a single case.
Note: the Hornady die has the tapered expander button. This may be why it doesn't stick at all.
Also, yes to your shell holder question
 

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For factory chambers...RCBS

Does the RCBS unit do a good enough job or should I stick with the more expensive and slower hand held units?
I have posted a Want to Buy in the classifieds.
With one brass maker's exception (Lapua), I'm a believer in neck turning for factory chambers for the usual advantages of uniform neck tension and concentricity. For factory chambers I really like the RCBS "3-in-one" tool which trims, turns, and chamfers the inside and outside of the neck. One can either use a drill press or a case lathe (electric or hand-cranked) to very good effect (read: speed!)

Generally, my match brass usually get the RCBS treatment for a first pass, and the K&M for the second pass, after fire forming. YMMV

P.
 
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