Varmint Hunters Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Good afternoon gentlemen. I have a question and need some help finding the best answers. I have a Remington 700 SPS 223. I have decided to begin customizing this rifle to the max in the hopes of one day handing a true nail driver down to my son. I've been looking at custom barrels, but I have no real knowledge of what all I would need to do. Money, really isn't an issue since I have several years before he will be ready to even handle a gun. I guess my question is, where should I begin if I want a true, long range custom 223? Any info would be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,706 Posts
Good afternoon gentlemen. I have a question and need some help finding the best answers. I have a Remington 700 SPS 223. I have decided to begin customizing this rifle to the max in the hopes of one day handing a true nail driver down to my son. I've been looking at custom barrels, but I have no real knowledge of what all I would need to do. Money, really isn't an issue since I have several years before he will be ready to even handle a gun. I guess my question is, where should I begin if I want a true, long range custom 223? Any info would be helpful.
first thing true (buleprint) the action.
2.8 twist custom barrel krieger/shilen/broughton/brux...heck their all good anymore.
3.H&S stock or the like bedded of course.
4.trigger job at the lest ..a HVR jewell would be best.
5, find a RIFLE SMITH...get it done right the first time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thank you! Are you familiar with E. R. Shaw custom barrels? Ive been looking them over. If you put a new barrel on the gun, does that require you to do anything to the action? The SPS has the adjustable trigger, but would you still recommend a custom trigger? Thanks for the input!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,898 Posts
What kind of yardage do you consider long, and what is going to be the use?? Your intended use will dictate if you have selected an adequate caliber, and whether you could buy an already factory prepared rifle for less money. Going custom is an expensive time consuming and sometime agrivating process, for a slightly smaller group size. LDS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I guess I don't have a set yardage I'm looking for. I just want maximize this gun. I'll be using it primarily for varmints and coyotes'.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
i want to turn this gun into the best varmint gun i can. so if i need to be looking for a specific type or length barrel.. And maybe if I should be looking for a twist rate for a specific bullet weight. Things like that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
You really need to figure out if you want a long range rifle or a varmint rifle. In a 223 they aren't the same thing in my opinion.

A long range rifle would have at least a 26" bull barrel and at least a 1:8 twist, a 1:7 would be better. The chamber would be cut so I could seat a 75 or 80 bullet out far enough to have enough case capacity to get the most out of the case I could. More than likely it would be a single shot deal.

A varmint rifle would have a 24" barrel with a 1:9 twist, fluted heavy barrel. Chamber would be appropriate for a 53gr V-max and still be able to use the magazine.

If your going for a long range rifle have the action worked over, if you want a varmint rifle leave it as is.

Jewell trigger for long range, Timney for a varmint rifle.

Bell and Carlson Medalist for either. Varmint/Tactical for long range and a "Standard Varmint" for a varmint rifle.

Picatinny rail in both cases, 20MOA cant for long range 0MOA for a varmint rifle.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Doug! I really appreciate it! If I followed all that you just said for the varmint version, what type of max range would you expect from that gun? Also, if you have a minute, can you explain the piccatiny setup you would use and optics you would consider?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,302 Posts
Those upgrades will put you in Cooper territory. They shoot very well and probably fill about 90% of most shooters needs. I mention Cooper as I have some experience with them. There are a number of custom builders that can put you in a very good shooter for the area of $3000.
If you want to go benchrest and long range, be prepared to pay. Advantage, you can do each upgrtade when you have the $$ as opposed to spending it up front.

You will have to determine your needs more clearly and go from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
Realistically with 223 and less than 60 gr bullets 500 yards on things that don't matter, steel, paper, p-dogs. 300 on coyotes.

I use picatinny rails on several rifles, than set my scopes in quick detach rings. Than you really only need 3 scopes for all your rifles. A 3-9 for a hunting rifle, 6-18 for varmints, and a 8.5-25 for long range. Figure out what you want to do put appropriate scope on the appropriate rifle and go zero it. I'll take 3 great scopes over 10 ok scopes.

Having said that my wife's savage 223 shoots just fine at 800 yards with 75gr v-max. If your not reloading yet spend the money on equipment. Your Remington will shoot just fine as is if you build a load for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
I was going to ask:

How does it shoot now?

My 700 VS in 223 with a Timney trigger shoots 55 grain BTs in the mid .5s" @ 100 yards. I use it on Prairie Dogs. It's way too heavy to be a calling rifle.

For that I have a Tikka T3 in 223. It also shoots in the mid .5s" @ 100 yards with the same bullet/load. It's a 1 in 8 twist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I do want to get into reloading soon. So why cant you have a gun set up for those long ranges, and use it as a varmit gun? I'll start looking into tge rails and scopes. Thanjs again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
Bullets used for long range don't usually work well on varmints... they work in that the critter will die but they don't blow things up like a varmint bullet. You might be able to get a varmint bullet to shoot on a long range rifle.... the rifle will let you know that.

I would start reloading and build a load for your rifle as is. It might be everything you want already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,024 Posts
Basically 1 moa is 1 inch at 100 yards, 2 inches at 200, 3 inches at 300.
MOA bases are used to get more out of your scope of you are dialing in turrets. If you do the hold over method they aren't needed. On my 300wsm I have a 50moa base which just about bottoms out my leupold scope and gives me enough turret adjustment to get to 2000 yards. I turn turrets, I don't hold over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
234 Posts
As George said: [5, find a RIFLE SMITH...get it done right the first time. ]

Look up Greg Tannels (Gre-Tan Rifles) in, believe it or not, Rifle, Colorado. Actually, he's about 20 mi or so north of Rifle. While there are various good smiths around, Greg will build it right the first time. He usually has a backlog, but likely no more than another good smith. I don't know where in Idaho you are, there are likely good rifle builders there too.

I learned a lot on my first couple rifle builds. PM me if you have specific questions.
Good luck, -West
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
488 Posts
If you will be loading your own, you may want to consider rechambering to .223 Ackley should give you about another 100 to 150fps. Better case life and a little more Kinetic Energy for those pesky yoters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,287 Posts
Is this something you are thinking will be shot almost entirely from a bench position, or are you thinking more of a field rifle? This will make a big difference in how I would approach the project.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,198 Posts
So why cant you have a gun set up for those long ranges, and use it as a varmit gun?
If by "varmint" you mean prairie dogs and such, then the reason one gun doesn't work well is that your PD rifle needs to be heavy and with a long barrel, basically a benchrest gun. You set the gun up with front and rear rests on a stable surface (usually a table) and it has a high-power scope. That's what it takes to consistently hit PDs at 200 and beyond.

For yotes, most guys want a short, light rifle that points quick and has a relatively low power scope, like a 2x7 or 3x9. If you're calling yotes and one pops up at 30 yards, your long-barrel PD gun with the 6x24 scope isn't gonna be worth squat. And by the time you lugged that 15-pound PD rifle to the fifth or sixth set of the day on a yote hunt, you'd be whipped.

Hope that helps.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top