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If we had all the old members back that were here
before the self-induced melt down, we would be doing good.
LDS
Yep! You're exactly correct Larry. WD
 

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Greetings Y'all. New member here. Planning a trip to South Dakota summer of 2019 for prairie dogs and joining here for advice and info.

I'm not new to shooting but need to learn some of the nuances of varmint hunting.

Thanks and hope to learn a lot!
 

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Welcome to the board Lugnut. Glad to see you come aboard. There is a bunch of good guys here and they are quite knowledgeable. A some of them are benchrest shooters, some of them are hunters and a few just shoot off at the mouth. You won’t have any trouble identifying g them. Chime In at anytime.
 

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I'm not new to shooting but need to learn some of the nuances of varmint hunting.
Sometimes we aren't much on nuance, but there's usually plenty of advice and a wealth of experience. Here's a sampling of the PS advice and sick humor available here:

  1. Don't EVER get behind on your fluids. It's hot and dry up there and heat exhaustion will ruin a trip real quick.
  2. If you're camping in either tent or trailer, take 3 times the rope you think you'll need, take duct tape, and make some custom tent/awning stakes out of rebar 18-24 inches long. No, I'm not kidding.
  3. Try to go soon after the pups are born, which is mid-May in the area we visit just south of Murdo. After being shot for a while, the dogs get more skittish and stay down longer before popping back up. They're still there, but the wait is longer.
  4. For best aerial action, hold low on the abdomen, which should propel the pups and smaller dogs skyward like an Atlas rocket!
 

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Sometimes we aren't much on nuance, but there's usually plenty of advice and a wealth of experience. Here's a sampling of the PS advice and sick humor available here:

  1. Don't EVER get behind on your fluids. It's hot and dry up there and heat exhaustion will ruin a trip real quick.
  2. If you're camping in either tent or trailer, take 3 times the rope you think you'll need, take duct tape, and make some custom tent/awning stakes out of rebar 18-24 inches long. No, I'm not kidding.
  3. Try to go soon after the pups are born, which is mid-May in the area we visit just south of Murdo. After being shot for a while, the dogs get more skittish and stay down longer before popping back up. They're still there, but the wait is longer.
  4. For best aerial action, hold low on the abdomen, which should propel the pups and smaller dogs skyward like an Atlas rocket!
YEP! What Mikey just said! (Especially the WATER/LIQUID advice. I recall a session among the pasture poodles on a 90º day when I got dehydrated before I realized it and experienced a brush with heat stroke. That was the ONLY time I experienced a really good outcome from a couple cans of Budweiser!

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