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So after switching from my trusty semi custom Rem 788 in 22-250 that I have used for years to the new (at least to me) 6mm Creedmore last year and the first part of this year, I need to do something different. As I shoot almost exclusively in SW Kansas and the OK Panhandle I thought something that was designed to shoot longer ranges and better fight the wind would be the answer. And, while 8 inch groups at 1K are super cool, trying to range in on a 10 inch tall PD at 527 yards just proved to be too much trouble. The drop on the 6mm made ranging much to critical, as even a 5 yard error in range estimation produced a miss at anything over 400 yards. By the end of this mess I had both rifles on the table and any PD that wasn't near a range flag resulted in me reaching for the 250 every time.
With all that being said, I am now looking to go in the other direction big time. I just think that I personally am better at judging and adapting for windage than I am at figuring range. I think I want to build a rifle that will deliver 1/4 MOA groups @ between 4200 and 4400 fps. With those speeds if I can range within 50 yards I can aim on hair for windage out to 600 - 700 yards. As such, I am looking for caliber suggestions. I have started looking at some, such as 220 Swift Improved, 22-250AI, 22-243AI, 22-6mm and some .20 caliber stuff like the 20-250AI. Even giving some thought to going straight .204 Ruger and loading hot, but I "think" I want to stay at least .224 as I do fight the wind. Not super concerned about barrel burn out as long as I can get a season out of it, I can set back or re-barrel each winter.
So there you have it, what cal would you recommend that can shoot 1 hole groups at 100, go 4200 - 4400 fps and last 1500 rounds or more before having to set back the barrel?
 

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Personally I feel it is hard to beat the plain old 22-250 and maybe an AI version would do the trick for you. To me it seems you would have to load a 40, 45 gr bullet to get the velocities you want but how to get the groups you want without a good match bullet. Generally you are better off with a heavier bullet in the wind so that is another consideration.
 

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The drop on the 6mm made ranging much to critical, as even a 5 yard error in range estimation produced a miss at anything over 400 yards.
I think you're going to want to re-think this. Your statement seems to be an over-exaggeration, as even a lowly 6BR with 105's would need at least 10-15yds of range error at 500yds to miss a typical prairie dog. I've counseled many colony varmint shooters over the years, and I've never had anyone have more success with lightweight bullets going super fast than heavy bullets going slow on distant shots.

Going to a lighter bullet will certainly not help the distant shots, and it will only help the closer shots if you shoot in an area without any appreciable wind. Obviously the acrobatics of the closer shots will be enhanced, and there will be less pressure on the shooter to drive the rifle properly. Faster, lighter bullet will provide significantly less recoil and be gone from the rifle much sooner... making the shooters job really easy. A regular 204 ruger with 32's or 40's fits the bill there just fine. You won't see appreciable difference in the wind between a 204R and a 22-250 with light bullets.

It would seem the solution you're looking for is in the form of a better range finder and a capable ballistic computer. Consistently hitting pdogs at 500yds and beyond is not achievable without those two things.
 

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I like the Swift over the 22-250, but I would take a serious look at using a slightly faster twist, maybe a 1:8, and find a tough varmint bullet in the 55 to 60gr range.
 

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When the 22lr, 22 super jet, 204, or 257 Roberts won't get it done...

When the wind is up and the range is long...
This one comes out of the safari box.

(The one that Dave built)


Off'n the bullsbag and bench...200 yards.
Of the four, the widest two measure, .560 center to center.


Recoil is so light that women and kids can shoot it. ;)

I may be even going back to the old school with a fast twist 6mm-06 😁


///
 

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I have 2 22-250 AI's They are my goto when ever I sit for pdogs. From a bench or bipod with bags. Once you find the load they like, and a scope that you like.{Varmint Hunter recital} 400 and 500yds is common. Wind will be the factor. But that is true no matter what you throw at those distance's.
 

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I replaced my 22-250 with a 22BR.
If you are shooting that far and solo, no spotter, a different cartridge probably won’t help you a lot.
You may well be better off spending $$$ on a high quality range finder that will range mounds and dogs at a distance.

Helped my buddy “walk” his 6BR with not a dog at around 600, took three shots.
Took us a fair bit of time to find one we could see at that distance, then fought the wind and mirage.
The next day was overcast/no mirage and no wind. We were on a different town and I was making contact on a regular basis with my 204 and 40’s.
 

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To paraphrase prairiedogger, "You need to find a scope and rangefinder that you like". I felt I had decent scopes, Leupold Vari-X III on my rifles, but while using a borrowed Leica Geovids, I could see the PD and the mound were slightly different shades/hues of tan/brown. That made them easier to see in spite of the 3x difference in magnification (7x vs 20x).
 

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Lol….we all have problems in the Pd fields. A spotter helps and always looking for better range finders. Take several rifles for different distances. The 22 BR is probably best for me. But I find myself using the 17 MK4 and 223 the most. If I were building a new rifle for long range, probably be thinking 6 Creed or 6.5x47.
 

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Lol….we all have problems in the Pd fields. A spotter helps and always looking for better range finders. Take several rifles for different distances. The 22 BR is probably best for me. But I find myself using the 17 MK4 and 223 the most. If I were building a new rifle for long range, probably be thinking 6 Creed or 6.5x47.
22BR or 22BRA is tough to beat in the dog town, no doubt about that. So versatile. You can run itty bitty bullets fast enough to get proper acrobatics... or you can run the heavies for the precise shots and forgiveness in the wind.
 

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Bruce, sounds like my stable. 22BR, 17 Fireball and 223.
I will say the 204 is edging out the 223, probably would have sooner if I had given the 204 a chance sooner. I do drag out my heavy 17 Remington, if it is inside 400 this rig will tag it.
I got into the 22BR and can’t say anything bad about.
It is enough that I have a hard time not building a 20BR.
As mentioned wind is always a factor. That will determine what I will use for the conditions.
 

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I would look hard at a 22-250AI or a 22BR. Good scopes and good range finders help a lot. I made a few long shots with a fast twist 6.5-284 but the blast and noise scared the dogs and sometimes I had a wait between shots!
 
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