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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, let me say how wonderful everyones advice has been on recent questions I have posted.

I am wanting to get setup to reload my own shells, and would like recommendations on wat reloader and setup is good for a starter. I want something that I will not have to upgrade right away.

Thanks in advance.
 

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New Setup:

Flyfisher:
Always nice to see a new member in the ranks. I assume you want to reload metallic cartridges for rifle and pistol. With that in mind, I'll make a few comments.

There are several brands to examine for reloading tools and accessories. The amount, cartridges, and degree of accuracy and interest you have will influence your choices.

The gamut runs from Lee tools (less expensive) to Lyman to RCBS, Redding, Forster, Hornady for the biggest names. RCBS has sort of set the standard for presses and general equipment. The RCBS "Rockchucker' press is timeless, and highly regarded. They can be found used at gun shows once in a while. The others mentioned all have pretty complete lines of equipment. You can access their web sites and see pics of the various items. Other brands of equipment are still occasionally found used if you know what to look for.

Before you do that, however, find and buy a copy of Lyman's # 48 reloading manual ($20) Any manual will help, but Lyman's is arguably the most complete for descriptions, articles, etc as well as load data. RCBS has a rather complete online 'how-to' page at their site. Peruse these sources and get a good feel for the mechanics of the operation before you invest. After that, you can assemble a list of equipment and accessories and hit the stores/internet shops.

It is, in my opinion, good to start with and learn with a 'single stage' press, rather than going to a progressive press initially. You see and do all the steps yourself, learn what's going on with each operation, and can monitor things closely. With a progressive, lots of things are going on at a time and it's harder to catch a problem. And, somewhere along the line, you'll find a need for a single stage press.

Most of the manufacturers have 'kits' that include the basic equipment for reloading. These provide a cheaper way to get into it, starting at about $225-250. You can't go really wrong with any of the makers, lots of it is your level of interest and pocket book.

I personally started with press/scale/dies from Herter's, back in the early 70's. I recently set up a used Rockchucker just to have an additional press. You can't go wrong with RCBS for basic equipment.

Good Luck, -West
 

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Rcbs

Back in the mid 60's I had the same question so after checking with my local gunshop I was directed to RCBS reloading equipment. I purchased a RCBS reloading kit that came with the most important tool in the whole package, a Speer Reloading Manual. The reloading manuals are the best tools to get you started reloading safely. I recomend that you purchase as many manuals as you can because they all have great information you need.

I'm still using the same reloading tools from that first RCBS kit along with some other specialty items that I picked up over the years. Over time some small items broke, always my fault, and that was when I learned about the RCBS Lifetime Warranty. A simple telephone call to the RCBS 800 number and your replacement parts arrive at your home in a few days, no charge. That same warranty is honored on used RCBS equipment too.

Our board sponsors MidwayUSA, Midsouth Shooters Supply along with others sponsors sell reloading kits. You will find our board sponsers to be the best source for your purchases at the best price. Shop them all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank You

Again thank you for the feedback, it is nice to find a group so eager to offer reccomendations and advice.
 

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reloading equip

It helps if we know what kind of shooting you do. I agree with the other fellows and would add that I like to load at the range so I have a rcbs partner mounted to a press stand which makes it portable. If you tell us where you live maybe you can find a mentor to help you get started. I read books and bumbled my way through in 1968 to get started but it is so much easier and less expensive (less mistakes) maybe less dangerous if you have some show you in person. If you are close I'd be happy to help. I shoot mostly bench rest now but have loaded for most everything in the past. John 859-792-8342
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Colorado

I am actually just outside of Denver, CO. I will primarily be reloading for a new .204 that I recieved for Christmas. It is a Remington 700 VSSF II. I also shoot a .45 ACP pistol quite a bit and figured it might be time to start reloading to save some money besides I think I would enjoy it.

My primary shooting/hunting is coyotes, PD's etc.
 

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The previous posts have pretty much summed it up. You can't go wrong with an RCBS Rockchucker to start with and stay with for some time. The move to a progressive press would be more of an addition than an upgrade to the single stage press. Good luck and good shooting.
 

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We have a winner!

I took the same step and relied on these same guys for advice. They are telling you the same thing they told me. I got the Rockchucker kit and, so far, have found no reason to upgrade. A buddy gave me a second press so I size with one and load with the other which keeps me from changing dies. All I've really added is a powder dispenser/scale combo to speed things up a bit. Get the Rockchucker and a good loading manual, you'll be just fine.

Happy New Year
 

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You have already received some great advice. I too started out with a basic RCBS kit over 35 years ago and I still use it at times. If you can afford it, just starting out, I would get the RCBS Chargemaster powder dispenser and scale. Reloading is much simpler and easier since I got mine. The Supreme Master Reloading Kit comes with one. You might consider the Forster Co-Ax press. I went to the semi-progressive press and then a progressive Dillon press for pistols. As I now try for more accurate loads, I am back to single stage work for rifles. I would use a spray lube such as One Shot rather than rolling the cases in case lube. I would recommend Hornady dies as they have a sleeve that helps load the bullets in straight. Later on you may want to get Redding or Forster dies, depending on your budget. When in doubt ask any questions here. There is an abundance of good information here, they have helped me out a lot and I have been reloading for several years. I had to learn how to reload on my own, no internet back then!! I saw a demonstration on reloading shotgun shells in my hunter safety course when I was 14 and that got me going.

You would then want to look at a tumbler to clean your cases with. You will want to get a good case trimmer, like Forster, RCBS and Wilson. You will add more pieces as you get into it more and you can afford it. I told myself I would save money by reloading but it turns out that I just shoot more for the bucks. I actually find reloading relaxing as I forget everything else while I do it and I can see how my labor improves my hobby. Now that is great! Just ask if you have questions on what to get, what works and what does not. We are always willing to spend someone else's money!:D
 

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One other thing, get an experienced reloader to help you

If you can make friends with somebody at your range, get them to give you a basic lesson. It will speed up your learning curve and probably help you to avoid some errors.

Maybe somebody on this board is local to you.

Good luck and load safely.
Dave
 
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