Varmint Hunters Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I live in Mississippi, and we have many coyotes in my area, I have tried to call them with mouth calls, electronic calls and have had no luck. I have tried in the woods, in fields and I don't know what is wrong!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
877 Posts
Persistance is the ticket

I know it is fustrating, but just keep on trying. Even in Minnesota I can go a long time before I get one. Not like out West where there is more population of them. There have been times when you can not call one in out West for one reason or another. I have my best luck around here just before dark. The first thing in the morning can be good also. I have my best luck around here with a open reed call, like Critter Call. Approaching the site quietly is key. To bad there isn't alot of calling videos on Eastern coyotes to learn from. Just keep trying. Sooner or later one will show up and then you keep learning from then on. Darrel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
How long.?

I live in Mississippi, and we have many coyotes in my area, I have tried to call them with mouth calls, electronic calls and have had no luck. I have tried in the woods, in fields and I don't know what is wrong!
.. It took a long time for me to get started on'em also.. And it still isn't a common occurance to be successful even tho the population is expanding a good deal.. Even so, I have fun getting out calling after a long deer season of sitting still.. If nothing else I see a lot more of the woods and there's nothing wrong with that.. :p :)

.. What chaps my hide is that the old man sat in his truck under our tower stand on "Doe Rd" this season and killed 3 Bobcats in 2 weeks.. Now I gotta listen to his crowing all rabbit season.. Hehehe.. d:^) Jake
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,298 Posts
Forget everything you see in those Western Videos...Pretend you are Deer Hunting... And be sure to use something that will Knock'em dead in their tracks, sometime you don't get the perfect shot and you have to take what you can get. Early Morning is the time and remember they love to hang around cow farms.
Just Like Deer Hunting and they will use the same trails.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
I'm no expert, but a lot of things can have an impact on calling.

If there are a lot of other people trying to call coyotes, that smartens them up. You may have to try a few different sounds or tactics. Turkey sounds in your country may prove to be effective.

Also, if you are in the thickets, you may have been more successful than you thought. I am constantly having to watch to be sure that they don't circle and come in from behind, especially if the wind shifts. Dogs like to smell what they are walking into. That has happened at least 3 times to me in the last 10stands.

Should be coming into breeding season and howling may help you locate them, but beware of giving your location away too much. You might try a decoy of some sort - even another coyote silhouette or something of that nature to take the attention off of you, especially with mouth calls.

Coyotes are curious animals and many times, they just can't help but come in to check out what's going on, even if things aren't perfect.

Be very cautious going in - like you are having to stock one right where you want to call.

Watch for birds - if the crows and the like are coming in - your camo is good. These birds often hang around the dogs for a quick morsel.

Watch for deer - if you see these animals moving, often it's an indicator that something pushed them - don't move.

If you've called a spot - you may want to wait a couple of weeks before you call it again and then change sounds.

But when it happens, it's worse than buck fever. You may have to remind yourself that you need to shoot.

Good Luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,298 Posts
Right down the middle on all comments and advice
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
116 Posts
If it was easy everybody would be doing it. My pard & I started about 15 years ago with a mouth call. We spent many hours in some really good country with very little success. After many near successes we finally began to get a few. I don't think there is any single thing that is the key,but a combination of patience, willingness to experiment & learning from your past mistakes will enable you to succeed. Read & listen to other people's tales & soon you will find a tactic that will work for you. Calling success is directly linked to the amount of effort you put into it!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
826 Posts
One of the Keys is location, location, location.....

in otherwords, you are in a location where there is a high population of coyotes or you are close to the ones that are in your area.

The main mistakes that people make are hunting on days where there is a high pressure approaching or there is a high pressure system parked right over the top of you. It is very difficlult to get preditors to respond when you are hunting in the middle of a high pressure system. For some reason, animals do not seem to move much during these weather conditions.

So, if you have a hunting day on a day in the middle of a high pressure front, it is best to not blow a varmint call, but instead scout looking for tracks, meet ranchers, or call in crows. We are socially conditioned to want to get out on "pretty days" and enjoy the weather, but these days are terrible for preditor hunters.

Coyote hunting is very serious business. You are trying to trick an animal into hunting you that day in and day out has to outsmart other animals in order to eat and has to avoid being killed by other preditors themselves.

Your hunting partner and your general attitude toward hunting preditors can make or break you. If you take the attitude that you are going out and shoot some coyotes, you and your partner are not taking the whole affair very serious, then it may take years for you to be successful. In other words, you and your hunting partner need to have a plan as to how you are going to hunt with extreme stealth, because you have to sneak in amongst the preditors right in the middle of their enviorment where they know the lay of the land.

You and your hunting partner need to take serious and be educated on how preditors use their sense of smell to detect their potential prey and to keep them from being prey...they are usually aware of wind direction and more often than not, they are going to come in from a down wind direction running with the nose in their wind. The sound will always carry more down wind so always point the caller into the wind.

When you pick a stand location, always be sure to be able to see down wind. If you are blind in the down wind location, you WILL limit your success because they will slip in on you, then turn and slip out the direction from the way in which they came.

Be aware that if a coyote runs across your tracks, they can smell gasoline on your tracks at a full run. You need to take a shot before he picks up the scen on your track.

A coyote can smell a man at 150-200 yards. A coyote can pick up the smell of an attractant at 300 yards, at least because the attractant is a much more stronger smell. If you use some kind of attractant, you have a good chance of a coyote getting real excited about the attractant and ignoring some otherwise very dangerous signals about danger that he may be headed for. Check the game laws, it may not be legal to use an attractant in your state due to the fact that it is considered a "bait". I use two cans of sardines in dark socks, two socks placed out 10 yards on each side of each hunter. In areas where there are foxes, it will greatly enhance your success with sardines. Foxes do not have much of a memory, they get the fish scent in their head and they loose most of their normal inhibitions. I have foxes return again and again to the call location where their buddies had been shot only a minute or so earlier. I transport the "Sardine Socks" in a 1 lb coffee can inside a freezer zip lock bag...big pay off for very little easy effort.

I carry a set of pruning nippers in a holster on my belt. I carve a hole in a bush and sit on a small fold up stool that is back slightly in the bush so that my outline is not exposed. Also, the freshly cut branches act as a cover scent. This simple technique has had numerous animals run within 10 feet of me.

Very basic do's and don'ts:
*Do not use the same tape of a rabbit or the same hand call all the time, mix your calling sounds up. Bird tapes and Johnny Stewart's Grey and Red Fox is absolutely the best fox sound out there to attract foxes.
*Johnny Stewart has a great instructional tape, buy it!

*if you are shooting a semi-auto or pump, load the round into the chamber very quietly.
*while exiting the car and walking to the stand, whisper or use hand signals
*pick a stand location where you can see down wind where your view is not obstructed
*put the call in a location where you can clearly see it,
*When visibility is only 50-75 yards, use much less volume because a coyote knows how much sound is too much.
*When hunting with a partner, wave at each other before you sit down
*When you start calling, you need to be ready to shoot. Often animals are bedded down within 50 yards of your stand location.
*It is hard to hit a running coyote, Bark your best dog bark to get him to stop
*When you kill a preditor, start the stand all over again. EXPECT multiples on a stand and you will get them!
*it is not necessary but helpful to use a camo face mask and camo gloves. If you are hunting in areas where you are calling in yotes where you can see them 175-300 yards out, then the face gear becomes much less important. When you call in a coyote in tight quarters, often they see you before you see them.
*when you start off your stand, start with less volume if you have that capability, then increase your volume after 7 minutes
*make stands at least 21 minutes in length and longer in dessert areas where yotes could be coming in from a mile or more. Also, when calling cats, make 45 minute stands
*a preditor's brain is geared to pick up the slightest movement. As you move your head back and forth looking, you are giving the preditor a chance to pick up your location. Scan, as much as possible, moving your eyes back and forth instead of your head. If possible, when picking your stand location, whisper to your partner which directions each of you are going to be looking to eliviate the stress of having to look at all the terrain that you can see.
* With all the above information, develop a plan with you and your hunting partner trying to be on the same page. It's a real bitch to find out that your hunting partner just wants to get out of the house to get away from the wife and kids and drink beer. You try to tell him how to be quite and he is not going for it...hunting partners can make or break you.
*When you are in coyote country, be prepared at all times to shoot a coyote. When you are walking to the stand, try to be able to carry your equipment in such a way to allow you to shoot if you see something. Especially when you are leaving a stand and start walking back to the truck, consider your stand an on going hunt until you are back at the truck unloading your gun because coyotes can come in to the call from miles away in dessert areas.
*Never forget that when you are hand calling that a coyote will come in directly to you. Hand calling can put you at a disadvantage because of this reason, while an electronic caller directs the coyotes attention away from you and can give you an advantage. I have 75+ hand calls + howlers, but it is best to use hand calls in conjunction with an electronic caller. I am adicted to the use of hand calls, it just gives me a great sense of satisfaction, I do not delude myself that I am sometimes at a disadvantage because they direct the coyote to run directly at me.
*all serious coyote hunters should learn to howl. Howlers imitate, young imature coyotes, female coyotes, and dominant coyotes. The howler immitates the Coyote invitation call, Female invitation call, Challenge howl, and warning bark. Two coyote hunters that are familiar with howling can de-frag an entire coyote family unit and have unreal success. Howling will work when nothing else does...learn everything about it that you can.
*When you are hunting in areas that you are unfamiliar with, if you can rig up some kind of siren or a very loud speaker that will play a Coyote Sunrise Serenede, you will be able to make coyotes howl back at you, locating them.
When hunting in Az, it was illegal to hunt at night. So, I started out with a very detailed map from the Bureau of Land Management. I also had a speaker system set up on my truck where I could flip a switch and my tape player inside the truck would play to two 12" speakers underneath my truck. I marked on the map locations that I was able to get coyotes to howl in, indicating on the map which side of the road on which the yotes were howling. When the sun came up, I was able to have great success using this system of locating coyotes. If there is a high pressure system right over the top of you, it is seldom that you get coyotes to do anything but bark at you.
*Howling during a high pressure system produces far better success over electronic or hand calls...coyotes either want to fight or figure out find out who the strange is in their territory.
*Don't be discouraged when you are not calling in animals. Review the above and see where you could be giving the yote an advantage, and form a new plan.

If you are new to preditor calling, the easiest hand call is the closed reed Johnny Stewart PC-1 and the Closed Reed Lohman Cierce MVP-3. The MVP-3 is an adjustable call that will do everything from a mouse squeek to a coarse gravley-gutteral deer call. The open reed calls are more versitle but they take a lot more breath to use and more operator skill.

Just get out and make as many stands as you possible can in a day...that is the key to success. If you have smaller properties to hunt on and are very limited in the number of properties that you hunt on, then call very quietly ever 400/600 yards and do not over hunt the property...usually no more than once every month.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top