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I frequent the board WAY too much for my financial health, but haven't really been out coyote hunting as yet - ok, I'm just an addict wannabe! But, I'm going to the northcentral mtn's of PA yote hunting this weekend and would like advise on technique in calling, and in general, on beginner coyote hunting. Again, I've read a bunch here, and appreciate all that I've learned, but doing it and reading it are 2 different things, I know. We are now allowed to bait here for coyote I understand and may try that too, but if I understand it right, this is now coyote breeding season and howling techniques may work better than distressed prey calls now when calling? We'll be hunting eastern coyotes in a totally wooded setting (no ag fields, or not many), and I think the fox population up there is low. I'm taking my Tikka 222/12 ga., but I think there will be 3 of us and we will have rifles and shotguns mixed to start, and we'll be using hand calls. Suggestions? Thanx.
 

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I get the impression from reading the forums that Eastern coyotes are almost a different animal than their Western cousins. And I have zero experience with the Eastern variety. So take anything I say with a large grain of salt.

But, the number one piece of advice I would give, and it applies almost everywhere, all the time, but especially in timbered/wooded terrain - choose your setups to make them pay for the wind. Don't give away an easy, covered approach to get your wind. If you do, you'll never see the majority of coyotes you call in.

- DAA
 

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OK

Markbo, I would if I had a dig. camera. Was on the wish list, but Santa (me!) didn't get to it yet. Used it a bit for fall turkey her in PA where we can use rifle or shotgun in the fall only, and it seemed to shoot accurately w/ Rem factory 50 plastic tips, but I got mixed results with the rifle and shotgun shooting to the same point of impact. Have to play w/ that some more and am looking for a low power shotgun scope w/ fine plex for accurate shooting. Have seriously been considering a scout-mount reflex set up, but not sure how to do it on that gun. Actually would like to do that to my bear camp gun also, a sawed-off 760 '06 Rem. I also have a Savage 222/20 ga. and a Armsport (nice Italian-made Mirrochi(sp?) 222/12 ga) - haven't got to wring either of them out at all yet - recent purchases that need ring/scope set-ups. Gonna try 50 gr factory loads for now, and #4 buck if I can find it. The Tikka is a 2 3/4 only gun, but the Savage and the Mirrochi are 3".

DAA: Thanx for chipping in - you are one of the guys here I was hoping would say something. I got the impression that the Eastern yotes are much different too, and that's probably alot of my reason for asking. The wind comment is WELL taken (at least I hope I remember that when setting up!). Maybe we have to do like them Kentucky boys are doing and bushwack 'em! My family has gotten around 6 this year near home during or just after deer season, all w/in a 1 mile radius or so, shot during chance opportunities, and all very mangy. Guess they're getting pretty bunched up and spreading it around.

Anybody else?
 

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Along with DAA's advice which, as always, is very sound, I'd say don't use the howler if you don't have some experience calling coyotes. A howler can work wonders in the hands of someone who knows the various howls, and their meanings. It can also run off more coyotes than it calls in when used indiscriminately. In heavier cover I'd use the distress calls, and not really loud, making my stands closer together, and paying real attention to what Dave said. If you want, go out the night before, with the howler, just to see what's out there. As a locator the howls you make won't be critical.
 

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Steppin' out

...ok, I'm just an addict wannabe!
Living coyote hunting vicariously through the internet. If one has to work that is the easiest and cheapest fix for an addiction. No guilt in that.

The eastern coyote sounds like a challenge, but it is still a coyote. Otherwise, they'd call it somethin' else. You may not get to watch it trip and come in for 500 yds, which just gets me all excited, but it will still be fun. But never leave a site thinkin' you did it all wrong. I always tell myself that the dogs were here, I just didn't do somethin' quite right, or they busted me in my approach, especially hunting in timber.

If you have been following this site, you know enough. Now it's just practice. Even if they are breeding, they still have to eat. Food is always at the forefront of their minds.

If you do hear a challenge howl though, take a chance and howl back. Just try to sound exactly like them, only not quite as tough.

Just gettin' out is half the battle. I haven't been able to call any in whilst typing.

Good Luck.
 

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Watch your backtrail

hunting in woods can be tough. The yotes have cover downwind and that's most likely where they will be heading. Take a partner and set up where one of you is downwind from the caller. 50 to 100 yards apart depending on the thickness of the woods. Try to keep your backtrail downwind if possible and set up on it. If your backtrail is where the yote can cross it before he comes in then you will likely not see him. I have had coyotes come in on me in heavy woods without regards to wind direction but it is a rare occurance. I agree with others on howling. You need to learn the proper vocals or it will not help you much. If you want to howl just try a long, high pitched howl. No barks or short howls until you are more familiar with them. Hope you have good luck.
 

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Along with DAA's advice which, as always, is very sound, I'd say don't use the howler if you don't have some experience calling coyotes. A howler can work wonders in the hands of someone who knows the various howls, and their meanings. It can also run off more coyotes than it calls in when used indiscriminately. In heavier cover I'd use the distress calls, and not really loud, making my stands closer together, and paying real attention to what Dave said. If you want, go out the night before, with the howler, just to see what's out there. As a locator the howls you make won't be critical.
I'll second that and from direct experience. I realized last year that my howling was ruining my take, and gave it up. At least till I learn how to....
 
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