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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was given a bunch of brass with crimped primers in 223 a while back. Today I picked up a Lyman primer pocket prep tool that has a gizmo for removing the crimp. I've only done one so far, and find that it puts a heck of a bevel on the pocket, way more than any commercial primer pocket has. The tool was on the sale table at the local store and did not have any directions with it. I took a chance that it is intended to bottom on the pocket to give a consistent depth of cut; can anyone who uses this tool confirm if indeed correct? I compared the tools that came with it to pics from the Midway catalog and everything is there that they picture. It was easy to do, I'm just worried that I'm going too deep. Thanks for any help you can offer. Ken
 

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If this is one of the standard Lyman primer pocket reamers you should be fine, I've been using one for 35+ years with no problems.

The way you posted about it...it seems it might have more than one tool? If you found it on Midway's website you might post a link to exactly what you are talking about.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good idea on the link. Here it is: http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=394805

If you zoom in on the picture they have, it is the tool just above the inside chamfer tool. The very top tool is the cleaner tool for scraping. It seems logical that one would ream until it bottoms in the pocket for consistency of results. Not having reamed the crimped primer pockets before, I want to be sure I'm not ruining the brass. It was $10 on the sale table so I took a chance. Doesn't look like its ever been used. Thanks for your help.
 

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I've got the same 'case accessory kit' or whatever they call it, but I've only reamed a couple of primer pockets with it. They looked about normal to me, though. I really like this kit, and the way that it motorized tedious but necessary tasks like chamfering and deburring.
 

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That looks very similar to the tool that I've had for a long time, except the one I have has a wooden handle, I have always bottomed it out in the primer pocket when I reamed a case, and I haven't ruined a case with it yet.
 

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I also use the---

old wooden handled Lyman tool. If you look you'll find the handle is pinned on--mine is. Drive the pin out, remove the handle and chuck the steel rod in a cordless 3/8" drill. This sure beats grinding them out by hand. Works for large and small pockets. I just purchased the RCBS Primer Pocket Swager Combo kit and tried it on 96 Lake City cases for the .308. If you get it adjusted right--deep enough--it seems to do a good job. I can swage easier than ream due to arthritis in my hands.
 

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Ken -Primer Pocket Reamer ???

U mite want 2-go back 2-midway site & click on Customer replies -R-Rating. seems as the the guys who replied ,didn't like going to bottom of Pcket. I purchased a RCBS tool @ Cabelas one time that would fit there Trim -Mate Power station. Taking it 2-the bottom gave the same effect that U describe, ie-Way more bevel then was needed. My thoughts ,Don't go-2-bottom, U will figure out quick how much is really needed, & stop there. 2nd thought, try the inside neck reamer tool 2 remove the crimp, that can also work, I have gone that route many times, again just a few turns. Good Luck. My 2¢.Russ.
 

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I've done several hundred by hand with a regular neck deburring tool, and then got a sinclair drill attachment for the same tool. Lots easier with the drill. Cutting out the crimp isn't real technical, don't worry about the bevel. As long as the primers stay in, you are good to go.
 
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