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I have a 25X Leupold spotter it is nice, but I want to upgrade. Can someone explain the angled body versus the straight body? Is there a major difference? Also, is there a major advantage of the larger diameter?

I will be using the spotter out to 600 yards maximum. We have just finished our new shooting range, we can get 540 yards. I would also like to use my digital camera to take photos with the spotter. Any suggestions would be helpful.

I bought a set of 8X56 SLC's a couple of years ago. These binoculars made me a real believer in high end glass. I do not mind paying for the better stuff, as long as it is worth it. Are the better spotter's worth it? Anyone have a good one out there they would like to sell? Tom.
 

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scope

The angled scope makes it easier to use while shooting sitting or prone. David Tubb 11 time Highpower champ has his set so that in the prone rabid he does not even move his head. He just moves his eyes. My scope is 26X out past 200 it is hard to see bullet holes. Mirage can tell you wind conditions and that can be read through a good scope at long distances.

Gabriel
 

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I have a 25X Leupold spotter it is nice, but I want to upgrade. Can someone explain the angled body versus the straight body? Is there a major difference? Also, is there a major advantage of the larger diameter?

I will be using the spotter out to 600 yards maximum. We have just finished our new shooting range, we can get 540 yards. I would also like to use my digital camera to take photos with the spotter. Any suggestions would be helpful.

I bought a set of 8X56 SLC's a couple of years ago. These binoculars made me a real believer in high end glass. I do not mind paying for the better stuff, as long as it is worth it. Are the better spotter's worth it? Anyone have a good one out there they would like to sell? Tom.
Straight vs. angled is a preference thing for sure. I had always used the straight type, but switched to the 45* angled scope and find it much easier to spend long periods of time staring thru it. (Sooner or later your neck muscles get tired, or back muscles tire from sitting/standing so upright to stare thru the straight type, IMO.)

The one exception where straight is better is when using a window mount to spot from the vehicle. Otherwise I find the angled spotter much more comfortable to use.

As for the objective size, all things being equal the larger objective will provide better light gathering and field of view. But, in reality it is the coatings and glass quality that has more to do with how well it works than forward objective diameter alone. Quality ain't cheap, but highest price isn't proof of highest quality either.

Frequent Flyer just did a pretty good review on spotters. His thread is worth a read.

P.
 

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I have a 25X Leupold spotter it is nice, but I want to upgrade. Can someone explain the angled body versus the straight body? Is there a major difference? Also, is there a major advantage of the larger diameter?

I will be using the spotter out to 600 yards maximum. We have just finished our new shooting range, we can get 540 yards. I would also like to use my digital camera to take photos with the spotter. Any suggestions would be helpful.

I bought a set of 8X56 SLC's a couple of years ago. These binoculars made me a real believer in high end glass. I do not mind paying for the better stuff, as long as it is worth it. Are the better spotter's worth it? Anyone have a good one out there they would like to sell? Tom.
I recently struggled with the straight versus angled decision too. I did a search on the web, and found a hunting forum where a number of people responded. A large majority said that for hunting, the straight is best. I heard people say that for spotting from a car that straight is best. But some scopes allow you to rotate the body of the scope about the base. That feature makes an angled scope far more useful than a straight, because it lets you turn it sideways or even upside down. From a car you can look without turning your entire body. I think I would answer you this way. If 90% of the use will be at the range, and 10% for hunting, get the angled. If most use will be hunting in the field get the straight. I chose the straight, even though I like the looks of the angled better, because most of my use will be hunting. A few years ago I was moose hunting on a lake in Alberta, I spent days hunched over a borrowed Swarovski 85 mm that had an angled eyepiece, whle sitting in a lawn chair on the edge of the shore. Let me tell you, after hours of that your neck and back gets strained from supporting your head in a bent position. A straight eypeiece would have let me keep my head upright. That recollection is what made me choose straight in my recent purchase. It is funny that Paul Workman found the opposite to be true. Maybe I just have wimpy neck muscles.

If digiscoping is on your list of uses I would get a Leica 77 APO. It is very high end glass, and worth every penny. If you go to the board sponser, SWFA (www.riflescopes.com) you will see a link on the left called 'the sample list'. They have that scope for sale there for $500 off. It is one helluva bargain, and the scope is perfect in every way. They simply used it at trade shows for demos.

I am going to get into digiscoping myself very soon. I have not yet decided whether to go with the remote camera mount (which allows point and shoot to be used), or pull the eyepiece and go with the extension tube that will fit an SLR with an adapter (much higher quality photos this way). The advantage of getting a good scope like the Zeiss 85 or the Leica 77 apo is that many people use them for digiscoping, and the support equipment is there for many different types of digiscoping. I saw a bunch of it demo'd at a camera store the other day, and was impressed with the offerings.

Hope I helped some with your questions.
 

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its two things to me, sore neck or the ability to locate the intended target. Angle is great for range work where its pre-aimed and it keeps you from getting tired neck muscles, but for game you are swinging the scope around and changing elev. I think the straight is easier to line up on a distant object.
 
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