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Hey Guys,

Dont know if anyone has any experience but I just got a 7 mth old english springer spaniel and haven't had this breed before (I'm used to Lab's) Have her about a week now and she's pretty much house trained and retriving well but seems to be getting distressed at night when we leave her on her own, any ideas on that or any other hints appriciated, thanks in advance

Brendan
 

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7 months old might be a little old for this trick; put an old wind up clock, one that goes, "tick,tock" underneath the pup's bedding. It's an old trick to get the pup to think it's hearing it's mom's heartbeat. May work, just make sure the alarm is not set.
 

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Springers

Brendan,
They are really good dogs, excellent hunters and gentle with kids.
My advise would be to try crate training with the pup. I have only raised and trained one Springer but I have spent a fair amount of time with the people that train and know the breed quite well. My dog is a male and when he was younger suffered from Seperation Anxiety. Nothing real bad but alot of stress on him. The crate provides a place that is theirs and theirs alone and supplies comfort much like a den. Research the subject and you should find all the do's and don'ts of crate training.
Springer's are much softer tempered than a Lab and I will pass on the advise I was given. This advise may or may not apply to all Springers or all dogs for that matter. Make sure she learns her manners first (hup, come, heel), no heavy handed disapline and if you are training her as a birddog make sure she is introduced to gunfire properly. Not random shots that may make her shy but during training with live birds so she can associate it as a good noise one that means dead birds. Other than that a Springer is pretty easy to train they do most everything naturally and just require birds, more birds and lots of love.
Recommended reading would be HUP by Spencer and books by the late Ken Roebuck.
Enjoy your pup, they grow fast and the years fly! My guy is ten and the bird seasons are growing shorter for us but the memories are long. The best ten years of my life have been spent behind "Lance"
 

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Sometimes a larger stuffed toy dog or bear can help as a companion. You might have to spend some time playing with the toy and the dog at the same time for a while. The theory being that the toy stays calm when you leave them alone, then the dog doesn't feel as much anxiety.

Some people try to find an older gentle dog to act as a companion, but I have had that backfire with pups.
 

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I agree with the crate training, I also added a t-shirt I wore that day to leave with the puppy in the crate during the night. Kept him quiet.
Another important thing about the crate training is to have a crate small enough to not give them the option to pee or take a dump in the corner of the crate. It'll force them to hold it and let you know thay need to relieve themselves. Large crates will give them the oppotunity to think about relieving themselves in the crate.

Ken
 

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Just like all the others have said, crate training is the way to go. All but one of our dogs have been trained that way and they all eventually looked at their crate as their sanctuary when they wanted to sleep felt bad or had their feelings hurt. However one of the most important things to remember is never use the crate as punishment or even associate it with discipline. Our 74pound Airedale still gets in her crate on her own at least once a night, even though her head sticks out about a foot now. We have always used the airline sky kennel type of crates for our dogs. Even though they(2 dogs)are perfectly behaved dogs now we keep the crate for the Airedale. We took it out once and she went crazy looking for it.
 
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