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Discussion Starter #1
Looking for some advice. I am working on a very decent shotgun stock. I have sanded to 400 grit and started applying Tru Oil. The wood was tight grained and did not need filling. I began with a couple of thinned coats and all is fine. I am applying full strength using a soft cotton cloth. I have used TO in the past with good results. I never worked with a stock of this quality before either.
When dry between coats I can see lines in the finish when I rotate the stock in the light, it does not seem to be flattening out as expected. It is almost like fine brush strokes. Steel wool or 400 grit knocks them down and when I add another coat, they are back
I am aware it will finish glossy and I plan to knock the gloss down with either pumice or rottenstone for a near matte or just off gloss finish.
I am looking for tips to avoid the fine lines and anything else you may offer.

TIA.
 

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Tom, I don't have a lot of experience with gunstocks, but I've been fooling around for a while now putting scales on knife blanks and there are obvious similarities. From your description, it sounds to me like you're doing everything right. One suggestion that might help is to go lighter and lighter with your TO as the finish builds. I try to use just the right amount of oil so that it dries completely as I'm rubbing. It may take longer that way, but you won't have lines to worry about.
 

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I have done two stocks with Tru Oil and they turned out great. I have only used it full strength, not thinned, using a piece of rag or just my fingers to apply and rub in thin coats. Also, I also sanded the wood down to 600 grit SiC paper that I had for painting cars. I used six or seven coats, drying at least two days each coat. Topped it off with 0000 steel wool.
 

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You should use about 5 drops, literally, on a buttstock after the first 3-4 coats. I put a drop or two on, and rub it very briskly, and the heat of the friction should help it dry quickly. Do this 7-8 times then knock it back. I reckon to have done about 250 or so in the last 37 years. Something I have started using, is quick drying spray lacquer, like you would outdoors on masonry. You can get gloss or matte, it is dry enough to steel wool over in about 25 minutes, and 3-4 coats in an afternoon and you are done, can be touched up to. This stuff is about the toughest and easiest stuff i have ever used. Hope this helps
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You should use about 5 drops, literally, on a buttstock after the first 3-4 coats. I put a drop or two on, and rub it very briskly, and the heat of the friction should help it dry quickly. Do this 7-8 times then knock it back. I reckon to have done about 250 or so in the last 37 years. Something I have started using, is quick drying spray lacquer, like you would outdoors on masonry. You can get gloss or matte, it is dry enough to steel wool over in about 25 minutes, and 3-4 coats in an afternoon and you are done, can be touched up to. This stuff is about the toughest and easiest stuff i have ever used. Hope this helps
Koger,
I have used the Minwax simi gloss poly as a top coat over the TO. I have done about a dozen stocks with TO but this is the first time I had problems with streaks.

Thanks for the heads up on the very thin finger rubbed coats.
 
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