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So I've been scouting some public close to my house for whitetail and threw up this cam in a big clear cut. I had seen some wolf tracks about a mile from where this pic was taken so I know they're back there but I'm honestly not sure if it's a wolf or a coyote. I didn't check the pictures until I was home last night so I didn't see the tracks. It has that coyote color to it but I think many of the Wolves in Northern MN have that same color. I don't see enough of either species to know for sure. Anyone have some opinions on what it could be?
 

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I don't see any picture to look at.
It would helpifthere was a picture, I don’t claim to be an expert, but I have had plenty of encounter with all three. I have trapped and shot all 3. But not since the timber wolf became protected. The coyote iwasnotseen in my area until about 40 years ago. Prior to that timber and brush wolves were all we dealt with. So any way, here is my answer to your description.
1. Timberwolfs are big, tipping the sales at close to 100#. An adult timber wolf is about the size of a yearling deer. As you know they come in many colorphaes. The range they Travel andcover is huge. 30 miles is normal.
I f your in an Established area of a Wolf pack, the chances of a coyote being there is slim to none. They don’t tolerate the brush wolf either The wolf eats them both
2. Narthern MN has what we call a brush wolf. They are a bit larger than a coyote tipping the scales at about 50#. The head on the brush wolf looks very much like a wolf’s but smaller. they can look very much like a year old timber wolf. But yearling timber wolves as rule run with the pack, not so much alone.
I have only seen brush wolves in one color phase and that’s gray. A brush wolf for the most part does run alone. In the spring when they have the pups the pair will hunt together but when the pups start to hunt the adult male becomes a loner
3. coyotes have different color phases depending on the area they live in. The coyote has a smaller head with a pointed nose. Normally coyotes are around 35#
Good hunting and be sure of your target.
 
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It would helpifthere was a picture, I don’t claim to be an expert, but I have had plenty of encounter with all three. I have trapped and shot all 3. But not since the timber wolf became protected. The coyote iwasnotseen in my area until about 40 years ago. Prior to that timber and brush wolves were all we dealt with. So any way, here is my answer to your description.
1. Timberwolfs are big, tipping the sales at close to 100#. An adult timber wolf is about the size of a yearling deer. As you know they come in many colorphaes. The range they Travel andcover is huge. 30 miles is normal.
I f your in an Established area of a Wolf pack, the chances of a coyote being there is slim to none. They don’t tolerate the brush wolf either The wolf eats them both
2. Narthern MN has what we call a brush wolf. They are a bit larger than a coyote tipping the scales at about 50#. The head on the brush wolf looks very much like a wolf’s but smaller. they can look very much like a year old timber wolf. But yearling timber wolves as rule run with the pack, not so much alone.
I have only seen brush wolves in one color phase and that’s gray. A brush wolf for the most part does run alone. In the spring when they have the pups the pair will hunt together but when the pups start to hunt the adult male becomes a loner
3. coyotes have different color phases depending on the area they live in. The coyote has a smaller head with a pointed nose. Normally coyotes are around 35#
Good hunting and be sure of your target.
That was a very concise and factual reply TV2feathers. I enjoyed reading it and was intro'd to the Brush Wolf....had never heard of them.
 
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